FBA Without a Dart

Last year I made a jacket from one of the Kana’s Standard books, and made a dartless FBA, a technique I used again this year when I added a FBA to my LB Pullover.  I’ve been asked for a tutorial on how to accomplish this on a couple of occasions now, but I really lacked the time to do it.  However, I needed to trace the pullover pattern again and reinstate the bust adjustment, so I figured that was as good a time as any to photograph the process and do a little tutorial.  Bear in mind though, that this technique works for me, it might not for you!  This is just my way, and I’m sure there are other methods out there.

Start by figuring out how much you need to add.  With this pattern I didn’t need to add excess width, just depth to avoid the drag lines.  So I cut the front piece from just under the shaping for the sleeves and angled upwards to roughtly the bust point and then went across the front, perpendicular to the centre front line.  I added a piece of paper to the top piece, measured 3cm down (the depth I’d figured out I needed) and drew a line parallel to the line I’d initially cut, then taped the bottom pattern piece to that line, ensuring the centre front line was straight.  The next step was to draw a line from the bust point, which in my case was 12cm from the CF line & halfway through the added 3cm, to the hemline.  Then draw a dart from the bust point to encompass the added width at the side seam.  Cut up one of the dart legs and down the line you’ve just drawn to the hemline.

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1. Add the fba, or length. 2. Mark the bust point or apex. 3. Draw line from apex to hem, draw dart from added width. 4. Cut up dart leg & down line from pust point.

Now close the dart in the paper by pivoting at the apex, this opens a dart from the bustpoint to the hem.  Tape a piece of paper in that gap.  Measure along the hemline to establish the width of the dart.  This will need to be removed at the side seam.  Mark the same measurement in from the side seam, along the hemline.  Draw a line from the now closed side-seam dart to the mark on the hemline.  This will be your new side seam.

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1. Close dart in side seam. 2. Measure new dart width. 3. Mark that width on hemline from side seam. 4. Draw new side seam.

Check the length of the new side seam by placing the back side seam along it, the side seams need to be the same length!  Chances are the new side seam will be a little longer than the back.  So mark where the back hemline comes to on the front and join that to the existing front hemline with a slow curve.  Cut off the old side seam along with any hem, this is basically the dart you added.  And that’s it!  Remember that if you’re lengthening anything that has a front opening and facings to that opening, to lengthen the facings too!!

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1. New side seam. 2. Check length of new front side seam against existing back side seam length. 3. Draw new hemline to meeet new side seam length. 4. Remove the dart!

I hope that’s all as clear as mud! 🙂  Happy sewing people, now I need to get cracking, I leave in a week and have LOADS to still get done before that!

Work in Progress Wednesday 5/19

More sewing getting done!  Must be the weather, April showers have arrived just on time! 😀 I have moved indoors this week due to a couple of rainy days chasing me off the allotments.  I have less than 2 weeks to go before we’re off to South Africa, so there’s a lot to do, both sewing wise and gardening.  As I knew the bad weather was on the way, I cut out 5 projects on Monday afternoon/evening and started the sewing on Tuesday (yesterday).  But I’m not going to show you what I made yesterday just yet.  Today I made a Kabuti Tee in viscose, and started on a dungaree dress for Daughter No2, which I spoke about in my last WIPW.

The Kabuki Tee is one of those boxy, loose fitting tops that looks so completely different in a drapy fabric.  It’ll be lovely and cool to wear in the summer.  It’s a pretty simple pattern, the only tricky thing is getting those sharp corners sharp!   I always pop a bit on interfacing on the fabric that I’m snipping in cases like this, just to reinforce the fabric and support that snip and spread.  It definitely helped with this viscose!

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Supporting the fabric for the corners

Next up was the dungaree dress.  This is one item that Daughter No2 is rather keen to have in her suitcase for the holiday, so I HAVE to finish it!!  The fabric is stretch cotton twill from Fabworks Online, chosen by Daughter No2 herself.  It’s a lovely, cheerful green, perfect for spring and summer!  The pattern is 115 from April Burdastyle magazine 2017.   It’s also not a tricky pattern just has a few pieces to get together.

I started with the front bib and pocket and added the loops for the d-rings.  The front and back bib pieces are all done now, and I’m ready to get the waistband bits on and start on the skirt and pockets.  I hope it’ll all be done by lunchtime tomorrow, when I need to get to the allotment to plant my Mother’s Day present, a Bramley Apple tree!  Can’t wait to make apple pie with my own home-grown apples!

 

Spring Green

With the Equinox on the 21st, it’s finally officially Spring here in the UK, and I’ve got a nice new springy green pair of trousers to show off!  I’d been after an interesting pair of linen trousers for a while, and was thinking of drafting something when I took a quick look at the Style Arc website.  They tend to have interesting designs and I thought I might be inspired somewhere along the line.

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Teddy Designer Pants from Style Arc

After a fairly short browse, I’d found 2 patterns I liked, one in particular.  In the end, I just bought the pattern!  Now this is my very first Style Arc pattern, despite them being very popular amongst certain areas of the sewing world, I’ve never bought one.  And here’s why.  Up to now, they’ve only been available in your size, although you get the size above and below your chosen size as well.  But – these are seperate patterns, not nested, so it makes blending between sizes interesting, also, if I’m going to be dropping good money on a pattern, I want to be able to make it for more than just one person.  I want more than 3 sizes.  You could also only get PDF download versions in millions of A4 pages to stick together – something I particularly dislike, or wait for the pattern sheets to be sent from Australia, paying postage & customs charges on the way, making this an expensive pattern that had better be good!  It was a pleasant surprise to find that this particular pattern not only came in multiple sizes, but they were nested and the PDF was available in A4 as well as a copy shop version.  Sold!  Now, if they start doing this with all the other patterns, Burda will have a real run for their money!  I wanted a couple more, but they weren’t available in the same format.  No matter, I’ll keep my eyes peeled and hope I can get them later once the multi-size copy shop versions become more available, here’s the link for all the multi-size patterns currently available.

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So, on to this one, the pattern I’ve been rambling about is the Teddy Designer Pants.  Pants, not pant!  Here goes another rant, why only one?  I have two legs, and want a pair of pants/trousers!  *breathe* I fell for the nice deep, long pleat down the middle of the trouser legs, sewn down from the hem and the waistband for about 20cm, the slight cocoon shape to the outside leg seam, the wide, shaped waistband and narrow hem. Basically, all the design features! 😀  I had some olive (bright) green washed linen in the stash that was begging for an interesting pattern, and I had just enough!

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Now, last time I mentioned there has been a little change of measurements around here.  Earlier in the year the #SewMySize hashtag did the rounds on Instagram, showing “ordinary” sewists with their measurements with the hope that indi pattern companies in particular would recognise the range of body sizes and shapes out there and cater to all.  I posted this photo.

But I’ve changed by eating habits and now I have new measurements, which means making different sizes! Woohoo! However, it also means I have a large pile of clothes that I need to make smaller so they don’t fall off me.  I’ll be adjusting for summer, rather than sewing for summer!  So, in the interest of openess and helping you to choose your size, these are the new measurements.

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I traced the 16 and 14, based on those measurements and toiled the 16 to see where I needed to alter the pattern.  Turns out the fit was pretty solid!  The waistband fits snugly on the waist, with the upper edge on the natural waistline.  There was no pulling around the high hip area, which can happen on some trouser patterns.  All I needed to to was to shorten the leg, brilliant!  I love the shape and the pleat, did a little wiggly dance around the sewing room in delight!

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Making was fairly simple, I know some people have a problem with the instructions, or lack thereof, but being a Burda girl I’m used to sparse instructions.  They did read a little oddly though, like they were written by someone for whom English is not their first language.  The zip instructions were weird though, and for the final garment I ignored them entirely and did it my way.  I cannot get my head round instructions that have you put the zip in backwards.  I’ll be changing the pattern a bit for next time around the zip, basically adding the fly facing to the front trouser pattern, this eliminates bulk and gives me more to work with to sew the zip in from the centre front line.  I might also bring the pockets up 2-3cm, but that’s not critical.  I made the pockets bigger though!  They’re too narrow for me, my phone and hand didn’t fit in, so I widened the curve to make more space.  Three centimetres was taken out of the length of the leg.

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Details

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I put the pants on for photos, and didn’t take them off!  I decided they were so comfy that I’d wear them for the rest of the day.  They really are good to wear, even the hubby likes them!  So, as I have yet to start the next Zadie Jumpsuit – in the black linen from the stash, I think I just might use it for another quick pair of these!  That way I have two pairs of pants to add to my suitcase for my holiday!  And I’d better get something else while I’m away for the jumpsuit…

Jumping into my Holiday Wardrobe

I’ve been after a good jumpsuit for a while, and made one last year from a German magazine that Chris gave me.  I liked it a lot, but it needed more adjustments to be perfect.  I even bought more fabric to make another, but the summer disappeared on me and I thougth I’d wait.  I then had an idea to make a pattern from the top portion of the Sew House Seven Tea Dress and a wide leg trouser pattern (more than likely from a Burda pattern) and see if I could make something work.  But other things landed on my sewing table and I hadn’t got round to more than just think of the idea.  And then Tara from Paper Theory posted her progress on making a jumpsuit pattern available.  I thought I’d just wait for that, given how good her first foray looked last summer when she drafted one for herself.

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Navy linen Zadie Jumpsuit by Paper Theory

The pattern was released a week and a half ago now, and I’ve made mine!!  Actually, if you look on Instagram there are some great examples of the #ZadieJumpsuit to be seen.  Lots of different fabric types, pattern or plain, and on lots of different people.  I started by tracing the sizes 14-18.  I’ve had a bit of a change in measurements lately, and can start sizing down! (yippee)  Checking the finished measurements against my current measurements, and knowing how much ease I can get away with, made me start the toile with the size 16, with no adjustments.  I already knew I’d need an FBA, just not necessarily in width.  Making the toile means I get a proper idea of how much length I need to add to the bust depth.  I also thought I might need to size down in the legs, as they’ve been getting skinnier!  The other alteration I thought I’d need would be to shorten the legs – but by how much?

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Can you see my whiter than white ankles in this shot? No? Need to shorten the trousers then!

I made the toile in an old duvet cover from the charity shop, and it ran up really quickly.  The instructions are really clear and easy to follow, with diagrams if you need them.  Once on, I knew I’d need that extra length in the bust depth!  Standing up straight, I marked the bust point with a marker pen, then I pulled down the front so the waist was actually on my waist and then marked the bust point again.  There was 3cm between the two points.  Voila!  Extra required bust depth!  The crotch depth was also low, like MC Hammer low! 😀  So I pinned up 4cm and it felt much more comfortable.  By doing this, I improved the look of the length, the trousers looked like they finished in the right place, so no chopping of leg length! Woohoo…

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So, back to the paper pattern, I drew a line perpendicular to the grain line on the bodice front that lined up with the lower marking of my bust point.  Then I cut along that line, stuck the bottom bodice piece onto a piece of paper, extended the grainline, drew a line parallel to the cut line 3cm away and taped the upper bodice piece to that line, lining up the grainline.  Then I marked a dart at the side seam, the point of which is 5cm short of the bust point.  Then I trued up the front line, crossing my fingers that I’d got the curve right!  I used the lengthen/shorten lines on the trouser pattern to shorten the crotch depth.  I also decided that when cutting I’d move the shoulder line to the 18 on the front, giving me another 0.75cm of length in the front.  Maybe I needed it, maybe not!  Time will tell once I’m actually wearing the jumpsuit on a regular basis.

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Boob wings in all their glory in this photo.

The nature of the fabric is also showing up one tiny flaw.  I do need to add some width to the bodice front.  Because of the cut of the bodice and the kimono-like dropped shoulder, I have little “boob wings”.  There is a triangular section of fabric running from the bust to where the armhole would be.  So I need to fix that before making another.  It didn’t show up so badly in the soft cotton duvet cover toile, so I thought I’d get away with it…

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My fabric is a 3m length of 140cm wide navy Irish linen, 137gsm.  It has a crisp handle, but is lightweight and hangs beautifully.  It’s been in the stash for a while, and I’d fogotten it was as crisp as it was, but I wasn’t going to buy any more fabric just yet.  It will soften with washing ( eventually) but will never quite loose that crispness.  The colour though, is great, rich and with lustre.

The cutting layout has you open the fabric to a single layer, right side up, and cut each piece individually.  This is because the designer is looking at the best way to cut the pieces with the least amount of wasted fabric, which, with the size and shape of the pattern pieces, is high.  So leave plenty of time to do the cutting out!!  And follow the diagram, or you’ll be caught short.  Seriously, I recon it took as long to cut the pattern as it did to sew the toile!!  However, I only had small bits of linen leftover, so it was the most efficient way to cut.

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Bias binding on the front, with extra stitching for the ties. Insides are all overlocked.

The pattern itself is easy to put together.  You have the option of making it “sleeveless” which really means a short, dropped shoulder sleeve, or adding the sleeve, which gives you long sleeves.  This means you can make this jumpsuit for cold weather!  I quite  fancy making a wool suiting version and wearing a poloneck like the Tessuti Monroe underneath.  The front of the bodice is bound with self bias binding, but you can make a bit of a statement if you go for a contrast colour or a different pattern.  The bodice is staystitched before the binding goes on, so there’s no chance of stretching the front.  The only thing I did differently was to overlock all the pieces before I started sewing, instead of neatening as I sewed.

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I really love, love, love this finished project.  It’s good to wear, shows no boobage when bending over (a critical aspect of any cross-over top) and stays put when moving about.  I double checked that one by doing a crazy lady dance in my sewing room.  In hindsight, I could probably easily loose another 2cm in the crotch depth and still have room to sit without squeaking.  It is a very forgiving fit!  The choice of size 16 was perfect, and while I could size down to a 14 for the width of the legs, this is a wide leg jumpsuit in a lightweight fabric, so no harm done.   I will also be removing about 3cm in the leg length.  Looking at these photos more shows that they are a tad long on me, you cannot see enough of that overwhelmingly white ankle, just about the same colour as my trainers!

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I’m heading home – back to South Africa – for three weeks over the Easter period, and this is going to be the very first item that goes into my suitcase!  Along with a large bottle of fake tan…  I hadn’t deliberately decided this time to make anything for the trip, so this is a bonus – mostly because I didn’t think the pattern would be available until the summer.  So, would I recommend it?  In short – yes.  I’ve seen it made by tall slim people, and by shorter, fuller figured people, and it looks good both ways.  I’m not the tallest person on the block at 1.65cm, but the proportions seem to work.  The fit is relaxed and loose, but you don’t feel like the saggy baggy elephant.  I have a feeling this will work on pretty much all body types.

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Now, will I make another?  Heck yeah!  I’ve just remembered a black 3m length herringbone linen that’s in the stash, bought 2-3 years ago when I first thought I’d like to try the jumpsuit trend.  Might even do the sleeves with that fabric, it has more body than the navy I’ve just used!  But first, I have a couple of Kabuki Tees I want to make, and some grey jersey that wants to be a Stellan tee, and make my first ever Style Arc trouser pattern, and I need to make two things for Daughter No2 that I toiled the week before last, and…..  BIBS!  I want to make a pair of hazel linen Burnside bibs to take with me!  Oh boy.  There is still the allotment and digging in of muck and starting of dahlias and sowing of seeds to do too.  Oh help.

Work in Progress Wednesday 4/19

A blog post!  Finally!  You guys have probably been wondering what on earth happened, radio silence for ages now!  Well, I’ve had my head down making kid’s clothes for a friend, and to help me to clear out those stash boxes of left over fabrics, and the weather lured me out of doors!  We had such beautiful, unseasonally hot weather at the end of February that I just couldn’t resist the siren call of the allotment!

It was luck that I hadn’t, to be honest, because now, at the beginning of March, I’m ready to sow seeds and plant stuff.  Even if the weather has reverted to it’s usual windy, rainy self.  So, now that the inclement weather is back, I’m back in the sewing room!  Last week I had a proper sewing day and made 7 Rowan Tees by Misusu Patterns!  It’s a free pattern for kids.  I traced the sizes from the 98 or 3 year old, up to the 7 year old & raided my stash of leftover ponte, double jersey and quilted jersey.  I made 3 of the smallest size, and randomly chose fabric and other sizes so I’d have enough for growing into, as well as fitting the older kid.  Those were all the remains of the fabric after making Toaster Sweaters, Talvikki Sweaters and the LB Pullover.  I’m very happy with my little pile, and will be distributing them amongst 3 kids.

 

 

 

But back on the sewing for normal humans – grown ups!  I suddenly realised that daughter no 2 would be home this weekend for the week – reading week at uni, and I’d promised a bunch of toiles ready for fitting!  Some patterns were ready to toile, others still needed to be traced – oops!  So I’ve made a start with a pair of shorts, and today cut the toile for a dungaree dress, 115 from Burdastyle April 2017, and traced and cut the toile for the blouse, 111 from February 2018.

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Dungaree dress 115
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Blouse 111

I also cut a top for my mum from her favourite Burda pattern (the fifth one this year!) and decided to experiment with viscose and the Kabuki Tee from Paper Theory.  I toiled that pattern in February in the size 18, but decided I could afford to size down one.  So, we’ll see if it works in viscose!  I’ve seen plenty of cotton, nani iro, double gauze and linen versions, but ot viscose.  Fingers crossed…  By the way, has anyone seen the announcement that Tara is releasing a new pattern – a jumpsuit – either this week or next?  I’m waiting with baited breath for this one, I really like the look of it when she made a version last summer.  Let’s just say I’m on tenterhooks, waiting to pounce and hit that “pay now with PayPal” button as soon as it’s live! *edit* it’s live!  Here’s the link if you’re remotely interested…

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Fifth version of Mum’s favourite top pattern to be made this year.
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Kabuki Tee in viscose. Mad or inspired?

It’s due to rain tomorrow, so instead of getting really, really muddy, I’ll stay indoors and start sewing those toiles!  I already have the fabric for the Burda patterns, so if I get those made up next week after fitting, it’ll be a good stash bust.  I also found the #sewbibs hashtag on Instagram this week, a good push to make that dungaree dress, and possibly to finally trace and toile the Burnside Bibs for myself??  I already have the fabric for those too…  It would tie in nicely with the other hashtag, #sewthatpatternnow.  And of course, #makeyourstash.  But I’ve been doing that one for a while now, and I’m only making very slow inroads into the stash boxes!  Mostly because I keep hoarding the leftovers!  Send help…

 

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My first daffodil! Well, Narcissus, really. So pretty!

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I’ll leave you with a picture of the Narcissus blooming on my allotment last week, before Storm Freya hit and flattened them, so I cut them and brought them indoors.  My first harvest from the cutting garden this year!

Simplicity

 

As promised – the woven version of the Paper Theory LB Pullover.  But not just one – two!  For once, the amazing top I saw in my head has actually lived up to expectations!  I cut the same size in this as I did for the striped ponte version, but I’ve added length to the front along the bust line.  This should result in a dart – which I did not want, so I rotated it to the hemline and removed the dart width from the side.  So now I have length, and no dart!  Yippee.  But I’m thinking I could have added another centimetre or two and it wouldn’t have hurt.

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LB Pullover from Paper Theory in herringbone wool and silk blend

The pattern is otherwise the same as the last one, with the exception of the collar/neckband.  This time it’s cut on the bias, which looks pretty nice with the herringbone.  The fabric, to remind you, is a silk and wool herringbone in sage green and ecru that I found in a local charity shop.  It’s really lovely to wear, soft, with great drape and warm too.  What’s better, I pop it in the washing machine with no problems!  I love wearing this top with my Birkin Flares, and it’s just as good with my Peppermint Wide Leg Pants.  It’s simple, clean and minimal.  Perfect.

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The length in the front is better, but could be adjusted again

 

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Version two is a fabric that’s been lurking in the stash since about 2006…  I’d been patting this particular fabric in my local fabric shop everytime I went in, but not buying it because it was expensive, and what was I going to make with a silk fabric that looked like a chunky wool weave?  Then it was down to the last metre and a bit and I had to make a decision, grab it or lose it forever.  Naturally I grabbed it.  But what to make?  That’s why it’s been sitting for so long, but this pattern got me thinking and I decided to use it up.  No, it’s not the most practical fabric in the world, but can I just say, it’s warm and snuggly and I love it!  And most people think it’s a knit, or wool!

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LB Pullover with narrow collar in woven chunky silk

There wasn’t enough fabric to ut that nice big floppy collar on the bias, so I opted for the narrower band, which gives a finish more like a wide crew neck on a tee.  I cut it on  the straight first, because, unlike the taller collar, there is no mention of needing to change the grainline for a woven.  It didn’t fit…  So I cut strips of bias the required width, stitched them together until it was loong enough for the pattern piece and started again.  It was still too short!!  AAAAHHHHH  I wasn’t going to add more bits of bias, you’d seen it and it would look messy.  And I couldn’t cut more, there wasn’t enough fabric!  So I stretched the bias.  It was on the back that I had the problem, so I ignored the shoulder markings and stole a bit of the front band for the back.  It works ok and looking at it, you can’t see a problem.  I checked the pattern pieces against each other, and there it is, the narorw band is shorter than the wider one.  I even double checked on the printed pattern, just in case I’d traced the wrong size, but nope.  So be careful if you’re making the narrow band top, your fabric might not have the give that mine did!

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I will be making more of these, but with a little more length added in the front.  It’s not that I notice it when wearing, only when I look in the mirror or see these photos.  The front definitely needs a bit more depth!  I’m looking forward to making some woven versions in summer fabrics and shorter sleeves – linen and cotton tops would be lovely to wear in the warmer weather.

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I had hoped to be running up a blue fleece version this week, but the remnant I have is just too short, so I’ll have to make something else with it.  The downside of getting fabric you didn’t specifically order/buy!  I guess it will have to be a kid thing.

Work in Progress Wednesday 3/19

I’ve got a little something different for you all today.  No clothes…  Well, not for people, at any rate.  Interested??  I’ve been sewing for toys.  But not just any toys.  I’ve been bitten by the Luna Lapin bug.  I bet half of you haven’t the faintest idea what I’m talking about – right?  Well, Luna Lapin is the creation of Sarah Peel from Cool Crafting.  She’s a little rabbit made from felt, with a wardrobe and a bunch of friends, all of which can me made by buying the books, or the kits from her website.  I’d seen images on Instagram for a while and Sew Manju made the prettiest little coats for her rabbits.  I knew there and then I needed to make my own, but not necessarily for me.

I know of a little girl and boy in New Zealand who would love a pair of rabbits to play with, so I’m starting with one for each of them, with a nice wardrobe of clothes to go with them.  I’m also going to make a rabbit for my grand-nephew.  Yeah, I have one of those!

I started by tracing all the patterns from the book (for now I just have the original Luna Lapin book), then I made the T-shirt dress and the little shirt from left over scraps of fabric.  This is the other reason to make the rabbit and wardrobe – to use up those bits of fabric that are too small for kid’s clothes, but perfect for bunny clothes!  But I still needed to make a bunny.  I didn’t want to be spending any money on this exercise, so that meant no fancy wool felt.  But I did have a merino wool jumper that didn’t fit, perfect for felting!  I tossed it into the washing machine & let it do its thing.  It hasn’t felted as much as I though but would but it will do.

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Silver embroidered linen footpads!
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The little rabbit head, and those devine ears!

It’s a nice grey wool, and instead of floral fabric for the feet and ears, I cut some silver embroidered linen.  I like the effect with the wool.  I decided, as it hadn’t felted as much as I’d have liked, not to have the seams exposed, so sewed everything on the machine, using 5mm seam allowances where marked, and 3mm everywhere else where the oversewn areas would have been.  It was fairly easy to do, because the wool stretches easily.  So the legs were sewn up and then I folded them down in half to stuff them.  The only problem when stuffing something that stretches, is that it stretches!  So it can’t be overstuffed, I’d have had a very fat rabbit!

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Rolling the leg down like a sock to get the stuffing in!
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Sewing the head to the body
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Don’t worry people, this rabbit’s ‘armless… 😉

The sewing process was simple, the book is clear with good diagrams, so no getting lost or confused.  I’m so chuffed with how my rabbit turned out, I’ve decided it’s a boy rabbit, and have called him Bay.  But he needed a friend, a sister.  In the stash of toile fabrics, is the left overs of some wool I’d got from the charity shop, and felted in the machine.  I had thought I could use it for coats, but it didn’t turn out right.  That’s why it’s in the toile stash.  It’s pink, but I don’t see why we can’t have a pink rabbit, can you?

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Rosebut footpads and a pink wool body
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The head and ears are much firmer this time round

This time I’ve used a cute rosebud print cotton for the ears and footpads, it has relevance – this rabbit’s name is Rose.  But she’s not as easy to sew.  Again, I didn’t want exposed seams, but this fabric has no stretch, is stiff and thick, and doesn’t like turning!  I managed to stitch the bottom part of the seams on the feet and attach the footpad on the machine, then I turned that through to the right side.  Once stuffed it gave me something to hold.  From then on, I needed to handstitch the leg seams, 5cm at a time, stuffing as I sewed.  It took time…  The head is much better on this bunny though, because the fabric was firmer.  The ears stand up better too.

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The grey bunny in a dress, but it didn’t look right.
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Now we’re talking! What a snazzy Liberty shirt! And the grey bunny said he was a boy bunny, so I called him Bay.

Once the legs were done, the rest was quick, the body shaped up well and the head was attached firmly and securely.  All I still have left to do is the arms, which I’ll have to do in the same way as the legs – yay! 😉  I have raided my stash boxes for suitable scraps to make more clothes for my bunnies, and I have an idea to make another in denim – but we’ll have to see.  Given how this wool sewed up, I think I’d have to have the seams exposed.  So maybe I’ll just make another in the grey wool.  In the mean time, I have bunny clothes to make!  They’re so cute!!

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Rose’s turn to be ‘armless, she’ll get her arms and eyes tomorrow, after my eyes and fingers have recovered from today’s work!