Black Teddy

Trousers – those most important of items in my wardrobe, all year round! I have two pairs of linen Teddy Designer Pants (Style Arc) and wear them constantly in the summer – so it makes sense to have a winter pair as well, right? When we were in London last month, I bought 3m of black cotton twill from a little fabric shop on the Seven Sister’s Road in Holloway. I could have bought so much more, but we squeezed in 2 minutes before closing time and I had to make a quick decision!! I must remember to go back there when we visit the girls again, I know I will buy more, he had lovely linen for the summer!

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I went with 3m, because my late mother in law always said “If in doubt, and you can afford it, always buy 3m!” Wise words, people, wise words. I knew I wanted trousers, just wasn’t 100% sure which patterns I’d use, but I did already have an idea that the Teddy pants would feature. The fabric has a good twill weave, isn’t nearly as thick as denim, but is sturdy and – most importantly, warm enough for winter use!

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Teddy Designer Pants from Style Arc

In the end, I decided I’d have both the Kew Pants and Teddy Pants, both from Style Arc, and cut them out at the same time to ensure there was room for all the bits! As it was, I cut the pocket bags from black cotton lawn to cut down on twill useage. It worked out well, because I only had small scraps left after all the cutting.

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The pants went together pretty quickly once I started them, as I’ve made three pairs already, I remembered the things I like to change and the direction of the pleat… It’s opposite to what’s shown on the drawings! I really like this pattern, it’s so nice to wear, and that long, deep pleat really is the bee’s knees!

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The other half isn’t quite as impressed – he doesn’t like the cocoon shape or the cropped length, but… He’s not wearing them!! Personally, I think this is one of my all-time favourite patterns for pants/trousers, and that’s saying a lot! Stay tuned for the Kew Pants, just need photographs – hopefully before I get to sit for most of the day and get them all creased first.

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Autumnal Sewing

I’ve realised that this year, I’ve worn a lot of jersey tops.  They’re so easy to wear, wash and not necessarily iron before wearing again!  But I love the smart look of a nice blouse too, and one I can wear pretty much all year round sounds perfect to me!  Recently, I “discovered” a new fabric shop.  Someone I follow on Instagram had posted in her stories, a delicious looking pile of recent online purchases from a little independent shop in London, Rainbow Fabrics.

Of course, I had to take a peek at their IG page, stories and website and ended up buying a few metres of different fabrics.  Then, 2 weeks ago, I saw some fabulous fabrics turn up in their stories, and headed straight to the website to nab some for myself!  Bear in mind – I’ve yet to make up the previous purchase!  This was becoming a dangerous shop to follow.  Anyway, I bought 7m of different viscoses on the weekend Boris announced the impending lockdown – as you do.

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Viscose purchases from Rainbow Fabrics

The fabric arrived nice and fast and I knew immediately what I was going to make!  Lets start at the beginning, shall we?  The first one I wanted to make was another version of a vintage Vogue pattern I made last year.  I just had a feeling that the pattern would suit the print of the viscose.

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I made the same adjustments to the pattern as I had the last time, but this time I left out the zip in the left side seam.  I really didn’t need it!  The construction was the same, French seams throughout and a little fine sheer polyester fusible on the neckband facings, cuffs and the slip on the sleeves.  Buttons are from the stash, a little faux leather button for the front and flat amber coloured buttons for the cuffs.

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Vintage Vogue 8095 in viscose

This is such a lovely pattern, and so nice to wear!  I love it in this print, which I was a little worried would be too busy for me to wear.  I have a habit of loving and buying fabric that, once made up I just can’t wear!  But I think this time I’ve got it right, and this stuff is going to be fabulous in my wardrobe, the colours work with all the trousers and jeans – and jumpers!  As the pattern doesn’t take as much fabric as I bought (2m), I have a bit left over that I’m hoping I’ll be able to cut a camisole out of.  I’ve not checked yet, so at the moment, that’s just a hope.  But it won’t go to waste, that’s for sure!

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Excuse the creases, I’m not just wearing the blouse to take pictures! This is real-life!

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So what else have I bought from Rainbow fabrics?  Well, I got 3m of striped viscose, 2m each of rust viscose jersery, rust plain viscose, and black and white spot viscose and 2m of rust cotton twill!  The sewing plans are developing….

 

Scrapbusting Trousers

After cutting that Grace Coat from my 3m of navy twill, I had a decent sized, if not a little awkwardly shaped, piece of fabric left over.  Early in October I decided, on a whim, to use it up and make a quick pair of trousers using a Burda pattern I used two years ago now.  It’s 117 from November 2018.  The original pair are too big now, so I traced the 42, but kept the shorter length adjustment I’d made back then.

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Burda trousers being shown off in London

The waistband of the pattern has a piping band through the centre, but I didn’t have enough fabric to cut 4 waistband pieces, so I had to give that a miss this time, not that you get to see it anyway!!  I cut the waistband facing and the pocket bags from left over shweshwe from my last Zadie Jumpsuit which also helped with bulk reduction.  A bit of pattern tetris was required to get the must-have pieces onto the fabric, including taking 1cm off the hem depth to get the length in!

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Making up is quick, I made the same adjustment to the back welt as last time, actually inserting a welt pocket instead of just pretending.  I use that pocket for my phone all the time, especially as the hip yoke pockets on these trousers really aren’t suitable for holding a phone.  The insides are all overlocked to prevent fraying.  I made a few small adjustments to the crotch curve and inside leg seams, changing the angle of the front line, the front curve and dipping a little at the back too.  I ended up taking in an extra cm on the front and back inseams from the crotch curve down about 15-20cm.  Somehow I aways end up with too much fabric here.

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Whilst I will still be looking at some drag lines, one must be realistic about trousers, you have to move in them!  And sit in them.  These will do just fine, and I’m glad I’ve used up the remains of the fabric, with the scrappiest of scraps relegated to the scrapbusting pouf.  I wanted another pair of casual trousers in my wardrobe, I always end up with too many smart wool pairs in the winter!

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It’s so hard to photograph dark trousers!  We had a great day in London, and I’m glad I got the chance to get photos, because at  home these dark  pants would have been impossible to photograph!!

Autumn Jumpsuit

Last year, Daughter No 1 was looking for a jumpsuit. She’d seen something online that she fancied, but not quite as it was, so could I make something more along the lines of what she was after. Of course, I said yes, and started looking. I eventually found a pattern that I thought would fit the bill, just needed a few adjustments…. the magic pattern was McCalls 7539. Unfortunately, it looks like it’s no longer available. You might have to trawl Ebay or Etsy for a copy. It’s a handy pattern with two options for the jumpsuit and two dresses as well. I started with toiling the pattern as is, making the size 10.

Eventually in October last year she was able to come home and try on the toile. We had issues!!! I had a list of adjustments to make, just in fitting, nevermind the style lines that would have to change. Here’s what was on my list:

  • shorten the bodice by 2cm
  • move the sleeve head/armhole in 1cm
  • narrow the shoulders by 1cm
  • do a forward shoulder adjustment
  • lengthen the sleeves to make a fold-back cuff – 3cm
  • eliminate the patch pockets on the front trouser and make hip yoke pockets instead
  • eliminate the patch pockets on the back trouser altogether
  • eliminate the belt
  • make a waistband/yoke from the upper part of the trousers, 4cm deep
  • change the zippered back to a button opening front
  • angle the centre back seam to create better shaping in the back
  • shorten the trouser legs by 12cm
  • make the hem of the trousers suitable for turning up when required, make a deep hem
  • taper the trousers to the hem approx 2-3cm each side seam

Just a bit of work then… It also meant that, in a lot of areas, I actually ended up making the size 6-8. Needless to say I wasn’t exactly quick off the mark with the adjustments. I toiled and fitted two other garments that weekend, and this one took the back seat for a while. This was because the other two toiles included a pair of 80s trousers that looked like they were going to be very interesting when they were finished, and I was dead keen to get on with them! Unfortunately, I still haven’t got photos of those… Eventually I made the adjustments in the paper pattern to the fitting issues, made the pockets, adjusted the legs and left the front open for the next toile, which was finally done and fitted this year in around July/August. A few more tweaks were required.

We decided on a 3cm buttonstand that suited the little buttons found in the stash. These came off one of the other half’s shirts! We had a little head scratching time trying to decide whether the waistband should stop at the button placket, or run right through. In the end we decided it should go through. The button placket is made of an extension to the centre front of 1.5cm, and a folded facing of 3cm with a little extra to fold under to create a neat inside finish. It was then topstitched and edgestitched.

New hip yoke pockets, narrowed shoulders and a new buttonstand

The pants were tapered towards the hem a little more and she decided the length could be longer than originally agreed, the plan is to wear the jumpsuit mostly with boots, and they’ll probably be turned up a lot too! Another toile ensued which was pronounced good, so now it was finally time to cut the fabric out! eeek!

The fabric was bought from the Knitting and Stitching Show at Ally Pally in October 2018. We both bought corduroy from Bombay Fabrics’ stall, her choice being a steel grey (with a slight green tone). Luckily matching thread was easier to find than I’d expected, because we no longer have any sewing shops nearby, and I found the perfect buttons in my stash!

The actual sewing of the jumpsuit was uncomplicated and it all went together fairly quickly. For the most part I followed the given instructions, except where my new pattern deviated! I made the bodice part up, then the trouser part and then sewed them together at the waist. Some areas of bulk needed encouragement to get them to sit flatter, but I needed to be careful not to flatten the pile of the corduroy. Overall, I am really happy with how they’ve turned out, and I know Daughter No 1 is too! Now I’m just waiting for her to ask for another pair – possibly in denim…

Spring sewing that’s perfect for Autumn

Way back in February, I decided I’d make the Grace Trans-Seasonal Coat from Style Arc as part of my Great Module Sew Along.  I had 3m of dark dark navy blue twill bought from Fabworks, and I already had the pattern after buying it on a sale, the paper version!  I traced and toiled the size 14 and decided I didn’t like it, but the girls persuaded me it looked better than I thought, but maybe it was just too roomy.  It is a little oversized, with dropped shoulders and no structure, also unlined.  I traced the size down, shortened the body length by 3cm and decided to just go for it!

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Constantly with the hands in the pockets!

I managed to make about a quarter of it when I had to abandon it early in March and travel to South Africa.  So it was still waiting for me when I got back in June, but I had no inclination to carry on with it immediately, it was summer afterall!!  Some summer, I still think that was the wettest, chilliest, windiest summer I’ve had here since the first one in ’97.  However, finish it, I did!  It’s not quite like the pattern, I’ve made some modifications.

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First off, may I just say that Style Arc instructions, drawings and limited online photographs are all different, so you cannot trust any one of those to be right, because they contradict each other.  The instructions that come with the pattern are limited at best, so don’t go there if you’re a beginner who needs hand holding, because it’s not going to happen.  The Grace Coat is supposed to have bound edges, something I didn’t fancy, so I added seam allowance and made it up in the “normal” way.

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The pocket…  Drawings show it as decorative, the instructions and pattern pieces provided imply it’s to cover the opening.  Online pictures didn’t help, neither did emailing Stye Arc, so I made it to cover the pocket opening.  (They have now changed their line drawings so it’s clear the flap is decorative) The line drawings show it as decorative, which is pointless as far as I’m concerned.  The pocket didn’t get a welt in the end either.  The welt pattern piece is too big for the opening, and unnecessary if you have the flap in that position!  You either need the flap, or the welt, unless the flap is to cover the openng, then the welt goes on the other side.  But it’s still too big!  Anyway, by the time I’d got there, I was just a little fed up!  So I left it out and just topstitched.  You cannot see it anyway, with the flap covering.

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The Grace Coat, from Style Arc

You have extra wide seam allowances of 2cm on this coat, which you’re supposed to topstitch from the outside, after turning under the raw edge.  It does look good on the outside, but what a pain to do all that pressing, and measuring, on the inside!  I managed to steam my fingers a lot doing this.  Maybe next time I’ll do a Hong Kong finish inside, and topstitch outside, might look good with a contrast fabric or something with a pattern.

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I like my finished coat, don’t get me wrong, but will I make another?  I’d have to think about that.  In the meantime, it has come in handy this Autumn, the high turn-up collar keeps the wind out!  Apologies for the creases in the photos, this coat is the one I’m reaching for most at the moment with the windy weather, it’s easy to throw on and the pockets are a good size for mask, keys, wallet, etc.

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Perhaps I’ll make one in a waterproof fabric..

Book Review – Sweet Clothes by Asuka Hamada

As the blouse/top posted last week got a fair bit of interest, I thought I might go into a little more detail about the book, and what it’s like to use. Now, if you’d clicked on the links from the previous post, you’d have gone straight to the book listing, where the seller has penty of photos of the inside of the book, showing the projects you can make. So I’m not going to add too many, but I’ll give you a quick run-down.

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Sweet Clothes, Asuka Hamada

There are 13 top patterns, one is more a sweatshirt, and two are made from cleverly seaming a rectangle. Some use the same bodice and have different sleeves or neck treatments. For example, the top I made, style E, uses the same body pieces as D, it just has different sleeves. There is one jumpsuit/dungaree pattern and one tunic, 4 dresses, one pair of trousers and a bag. You really need to look past the thin model and her odd stance (and sometimes the fabric choices!) to see the potential. I’m definitely making up a few more of the patterns, some for me and some for Daughter No 2.

The patterns are all clearly marked on the pull-out sheets in the back, and are easy to trace. Each sheet has a section showing the letters of the patterns (no numbers) and around the edges of the sheet, those letters have lines joining them to the pieces you need to trace. There are no seam allowances included on the pieces, and the instruction section shows you how much to add, and where to add it, in the cutting layout. The size table is in the section at the back with the instructions. There are three sizes, Small to Medium, Medium to Large and Small to Large – which means one size fits all! The first size accommodates bust measurements 75-83cm, and the second 83-92cm.

All instructions are in Japanese, but if you download the Google Translate app onto your phone and hover it over the text, you’ll be sorted! I tend to make pencil translations in the areas where I know I’ll be back, looking and checking info. Each pattern has a diagram showing finished width across the bust, as well as numbers showing you the order of making up. There are diagrams with Japanese text as well, and for the most part the diagrams are good enough to be able to make the garment up, but you can use your Translate app for areas where you’re not too sure.

All in, I was happy with my purchase of the book, I know I’ll be making more of the patterns, most likely the tops, just because I’m not really a dress person and the trousers in the Kana’s Standard are nicer! I hope this makes it easier to decide whether Japanese Sewing Books are for you or not!

Clouds & Smoke

Well, it’s been a while, hasn’t it?  In this topsy turvy year, not much sewing is happening, and what is isn’t always big-time blog worthy.  Not that I don’t want to show you everything, but once you’ve seen 3 or 4 LBPullovers, how many more do you really need?  So yes, I’ve been sewing, and no, it’s not all made it on here.  Except for this top.  This deserves a blog post all of its own.

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Top E from Sweet Clothes by Asuka Hamada

Earlier this year, after seeing someone post on Instagram about her new delivery of Japanese sewing books, I ordered Sweet Clothes, by Asuka Hamada from my favoutite Etsy book seller.  It arrived well within a week and was devoured pretty quickly.  Some patterns are definitely not me, or the girls, but others have massive potential.  Potential that was not fulfilled until this month.  On reclaiming my sewing room just over a week ago, I made a short list of projects I’d like to have done by the end of the month (today), and included a toile of one of the tops in the book.  The pattern is for Top E, a simple boxy bodice with 3/4 quarter sleeves, gathered into a narrow cuff, with a bias finished boat neckline.

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I’d traced sizes 1 & 2 and decided to go with the 2 for me, the finished width looked ok, so I went for it.  The only thing I needed to change was the neckline in the front, it was strangling me!  Amazingly I decided I didin’t need a FBA, the length was perfect and I was happy with the fit around the bust.  Now this is just me, someone else might prefer more ease and so add an FBA.  I prefer not to drown in nice big sleeves ans well as bodice fabric.  And these sleeves are very nice and very big!

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The sleeves were so wide I needed to cut them on the cross grain to fit them onto the fabric!  They are gathered at the cuff into a narrow band that should be elasticated, but I did away with that as the cuffs fit me just fine.  It’s all that digging on the allotment, I have muscular forearms!  After lowering the front neckline 4cm I started cutting.  It was the fabric that dictated I use this pattern, by the way.  It was a purchase from last year, from one of those deadstock websites, but I cannot remember which, and I doubt they still have any.  I was taken by the swirls of black white and grey, and the 100% cotton tag, but when it arrived, it proved to be much lighter in weight than I’d expected.  I was going to make a jumpsuit with it..  But this is cotton voile, definitely not jumpsuit material!

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The insides are all French seamed and the hem double turned.  You finish the neckline first, before doing any other sewing, I guess it makes sure it doesn’t get stretched out.  There’s no interfacing anywhere, and if you leave out the elastic at the cuff, it’s a very quick make.  I absolutely love this top and I know I will get a lot of wear out of it.  It looks fabulous with the copper/rust/cinnamon colours in my autumn/winter wardrobe and I think it’ll do nicely with jeans too.  Apart from the sleeves, this is not a fabric hungry pattern, so of the 3m of fabric originally bought, there’s a bit left.  So I thought I might make the Olya Shirt from Paper Theory

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Looking smug and very happy with myself!

Shweshwe Zadie Jumpsuit

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Me again!  I might finally be back in the UK, but the sewing is s.l.o.w.!  I haven’t quite got back to “normal”, because life isn’t normal.  Mr W moved his office into my sewing room while I was away and he had to work from home.  Now that work can happen at the “proper” office, but only twice a week, he’s still firmly ensconced in the sewing room.  It’s hard to find room for sewing machines and ironing amongst the computer, A3 files, boxes of samples and other paraphanalia a busy architect needs.  Not to mention the constant phone calls, with and without video…

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So the sewing has been happening on the dining table, cutting out on the living room floor.  It’s not ideal, and I’m still itching to sew more, but I think we all need to get used to life as not-normal.  It’s been weird to have continual company nowadays, instead of being on my own all day!  But, I do actually have something I made to show you.

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Back in June, there were a couple of “challenges” I thought I’d join in with, the #JumpingIntoJune sewalong encouraged the making of jumpsuits, and Stephanie at Sea of Teal was promoting sewing with prints for June’s Sew Your Wardrobe Basics.  So, on the last day of June I cut and started a print jumpsuit.  Not so much jumping into June as jumping out of it!

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Pockets – nice BIG ones!

I do love the Zadie Jumpsuit, it’s so comfy to wear, and quick to make.  This version is the size 16, with no FBA!  I had realised with the last summer version I made last year, that with the FBA the waistline seam sat too low.  So I reversed that adjustment and just made the smaller size.  I’m happy to report that it’s all worked, fits properly, doesn’t gape, and the waistline is in the right place.

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The fabric is a cotton shweshwe print I bought in South Africa in May.  This isn’t the Da Gams Three Cats fabric.  It had “Cheetah Shweshwe” in the selvage, but I can’t find much info about it.  It’s wider than the Da Gama fabric at 150cm and slightly stiffer, but that will go with washing.  It’s no stiffer than the blue linen used for my first Zadie.  I love the spotty print, it caught my eye in the fabric shop immediately, and straight away I knew I wanted to make the Zadie Jumpsuit with it.

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Got to love a spotty print!

This isn’t the end of my Shweshwe journey, I bought another piece for myself which will become a nice new pair of Carolyn PJ pants, and lots of pieces that I bought for making things for the girls.  Now I just need the time to make it all up!!!

Sewing in Different Circles

Phew, it has been a while hasn’t it?!  It’s been a crazy couple of months, and so, so much has changed, some things forever.  The last time I popped in, I was sewing for the Great Module Sewalong.  That all came to a grinding halt when I got the news that my Dad had passed away suddenly at the end of the first week in March.  I got on the next available plane home to South Africa with my girls as support to do what I could for my Mum, all thoughts of sewing left behind.

Then the world went mad.  Luckily the girls were able to get home just in time before the barriers came down and the walls went up.  I had had no plans to sew much, my thoughts were of paperwork, loose ends (of which there are still many) and support for mum.  Naturally I missed my favourite activity, as well as my allotment, which I had to leave just as seeds were germinating – along with millions of weeds.

I had planned on fabric shoping however.  But in the crazy first two weeks out here, there was no time for that second favourite activity.  Then the government announced a nationwide lockdown, all but essential services allowed to operate, and fabric shopping went completely out of the window.  Now we’re into May and a relaxing of the rules, fabric shops are allowed to be open to sell fabric to make masks and winter clothing.  Yes, May in the Southern Hemisphere is winter, although with temperatures this week in the mid to high 20s, it’s not anything like a UK winter.  Or summer!  😀  Thankfully winter means no humidity, just nice warm sunshine.

Anyway, back to the shopping!!  A typical South African cloth is produced here in East London in the Eastern Cape, Shweshwe.  I wrote about it a couple of years ago, if you want to know more.  The Da Gama factory isn’t open, but the factory shop in town is, so, under the guise of requiring lots of cotton to make face masks, Mum and I went shopping.  As it’s “winter”, I decided I needed another couple of pairs of longer than cropped length trousers.  I got two lots of  2m of Shweshwe for some Style Arc Kew Pants, I’d bought the pattern in their Easter Sale with the Como Top and the Teddy Top, to go with the Teddy Pants.

But – I’d completely forgotten that Shweshwe is only 90cm wide…  2m will make one trouser leg, not a pair of trousers!  Of course, that meant we had to go back!  This time I had better plans, get another 2m of one of the fabrics to actually make the pants, and 1.5 to make an Ogden Cami to go under a thin jumper I’d brought with me.  But then I spotted a waxed cotton fabric while waiting for the assistant to cut the Shweshwe, and fell in love!  So I bought 4.5m of the best bold, but neutral print wax cotton they had.  And 7m of Shweshwe with a cream ground with brown and orange print for daughter No1.  I hope it all fits into the suitcase…  Daughter No 2 has yet to put in her order.

So, lots of shopping, but what about the sewing??  Well, I think we’ve finally reached that part of the lockdown when we’re done with most of the big jobs, and now I feel that I can take a bit of time to myself and make something.  Once I’d realised I’d made a boob with the fabric amounts, I thought I’d make a top with one of the pieced I’d bought originally.  The fabric has body even after the wax has been washed off, so nothing drapy.  Immediately the LB Pullover from Paper Theory sprung to mind.  Thank heavens I brought my laptop with me on this trip, so I had immediate access to all my pdf patterns.  I just needed to print it off.  Now here’s where mum came in useful – she and dad own a stationery shop, complete with everyting I need to trace a pattern, and to print it too!  The only downside was having to print on A4, but an evening with the scissors, tape and a couple of glasses of wine made short work of that tedious job.

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I made the 16, no adjustments.  The 2m was literally just enough to squeeze the pieces onto, and I had to piece the bias cut collar together.  There were only the smallest scraps of fabric leftover.  It was the perfect choice of pattern for the fabric, and print and I love it!  It’s going to fit into my wardrobe at home perfectly, as well as add colour and shape to the small amount I’ve brought with me.  It’s very tempting to make another, but I need to keep an eye on the amount of weight of that suitcase, especially if I’m going to be stuck here for another few months…

 

The Great Module Sewalong Challenge

You’ve seen the three tops in the form of Tee-shirts that are required in the challenge, but I have another!  I wanted to make a top from the February Burda, top 119.  I bought a metre and a half of grey marl sweatshirting with French terry back from Fabworks and boy was it the right fabric!!  Lets just say that I’m wearing that top whenever it’s clean and dry.  I traced the 42 and didn’t do a FBA, which, in hindsight, I really should have done.  There’s definitely upward pulling going on which a FBA would have prevented.  Ah well, next time!  I lengthened the body by 5cm and am definitely happy with that decision!  It would have been way too short otherwise.

 

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Burda top 119 February 2020

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The fabric is perfect for the style, it holds the shape really well.  The only thing I’d change for the next time would be to reduce the height of the collar.  I’m wearing it folded over all the time – for me it’s just too high, so could do with 2-3cm shaved off on each side.  But apart from that, this is a great top!  I love with my 3/4 sleeve Uvitas, I like the colour and pattern popping out of the sleeve and just below the hem.  Looks like I’m talking myself into making another…

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Now for the pants…  These are the one item I’m not that sold on, and might will have to find a replacement for.  The pattern I chose is 107 from August Burda 2019 – which states it’s designed for fabrics with and without stretch, and which, in the magazine, they’ve made in ponte.  So I bought 2m of viscose ponte in pistachio from Fabworks and set to work.  Making a fly front, hip yoke pair of trousers in ponte was an interesting project.  I like the colour, but I wonder if it shouldn’t have had a little more oompfh.  Nevermind, as it is, I don’t think this pattern wasn’t necessarily designed for ponte fabric.

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Burda pants 107 August 2019

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I cut the 40, as the previous pair I made in wool in the size 42 are too loose.  But still I needed to take these in an extra 2cm on each side seam and 4cm in the back.  The waistband was interfaced with stretch interfacing, and still halfway though the day I’m having to yank them back up into place.  If, and this is a big if, I make this pattern again, I’ll remove a centimetre or two from the crotch depth, and make a 38 in a knit, possibly the 38/40 in a woven.  I love the pleats at the hem, that detail is just fabulous, but the rest of the garment just isn’t working.  It’s such a shame!!  I think I’m going to have to open the waistband up and insert some elastic, or possibly even grossgrain ribbon.  It just needs to stay up!!

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Hem and button details

So, three successful tees done, one sweatshirt top and one pair of dodgy trousers.  I have toiled the “topper” part of the challenge and have identified at least another 3 pairs of trousers that would fit the bill for the bottoms.  They’re all Burda patterns and will need to be traced, but at least I’m finally finding something in the latest magazines that I want to make!