End of Summer Trousers

 

Here we are, almost two weeks into September and I still haven’t shown off the last pair of linen trousers made – last month!  I  have to admit to being in a bit of a sewing funk, but I hope I’ve turned that corner this week!  More on that later, I thought I’d pop in and let you all know that I’m still here, and back to sewing.  I suppose I also need to admit that I haven’t made those shorts for the other half.  August was not shorts weather – so no need!!  I will carry on with the sewing for him though, at some point!!

Burda trousers 102, 07/2009

Right, this is another pair of the trousers from Burda July 2009, number 102.  I made a pair in reddish linen back in April that have been on constant rotation this year.  I love the leg width and length, they’re just so darned comfy to wear!  Anyway, in June I bought 2m of a beautiful silvery blue stretch linen from Rags and Rolls on the Seven Sisters Road in Holloway and knew I’d be making another pair.

This time I’ve not used a contrasting fabric for pocket linings or waistbands.  Having a stretch content, I sized down from the hip up because otherwise they’d be sliding down by lunchtime!  I acutally could do with nipping them in a little more, or making the belt loops and finding myself a belt to wear with them!  Again, so nice to wear!

I guess there’s not much more to say about them really, but try to track down the pattern if you want a comfy pair of trousers for the summer (and winter tbh, I’ve made them in wool and lined them before).

In other news – I made a good start to my Autumn sewing this week!!  Since Friday last week I’ve cut out and sewn a pair of jeans, a shirt, two sweatshirts and a top.  I suddenly got all inspired and have traced a whole load of stuff too, so tomorrow I’m going to try to get some photos of the stuff made so far and get some toiles done.  I’m feeling all seasonal!

Colour Update – Green

Remember weeks ago I said I wanted to add green to my palette?  Actually, it might even be a month ago!  Back in May I bought a stripe olive and ecru tee, which prompted me to buy a few pieces of olive/khaki fabric to create a mini capsule wardrobe that would also fit in with the greys, black and blues of the existing wardrobe.  I got a 2m piece of cotton linen from Truro Fabrics and decided to make a pair of Burda trousers with it.

collage burda 107 03 2021

The pattern is style 107 from Burda March 2021.  I started with the size 44, but traced the 42 as well, just in case!  Knowing I wanted pockets and to move the zip position, I started with the pockets.  I drew up a pattern for inseam pockets that would be supported by the facing seam, I don’t like the way the Teddy Pants have flappy pockets, the one thing I have changed on the pattern.  I made them deep and wide enough to fit my phone and other items and not have them fall out when I sit down.

collage inseam pockets
I have to have pocketses!

Then I needed to play with the front.  I decided to have a front fly zip with fly bearer the way some men’s trousers work.  It’s the best way to have a fly zip when there’s no waistband and button.  The front detail needed to be operational, rather than purely decorative, so it has working buttonholes for the buttons.  It means there are a lot of buttons to faff with when you need to go to the loo, but it works.

collage fly zip
Front fly zip with fly bearer

To minimise bulk I used some cotton fabric from the scrap box for the facings, reverse side of the front flap detail and one layer of the pocket bags.  The toile showed the 44 at the waist was the right size, but I needed to shave off a little at the hip, so I switched to the 42 and followed that down to the hem.  I shortened the crotch depth by 2cm and took 3cm off the overall length of the leg as well.  Looking back, I could probably have left this last adjustment, or only taken 1-2cm off.

collage black toile
Toile of the trousers, crotch too low and trouser length too long

I made the toile “wearable” using a pintucked cotton duvet cover that I’d dyed black.  I thought it would give the right amount of body.  I actually prefer it to the linen version!  And I think it’s because it has more body than the linen.  So technically I have two new pairs of trousers, and I haven’t wasted the toile fabric, which is nice.

collage olive zip
Contrast cotton fabric reduces bulk with all those layers.

As you can see, I omitted the buttoned outside leg detail, that wasn’t the look I was going for, so this isn’t a really good review of the pattern!  I’ve changed too many things!  But I do like the width of the legs, and I don’t think it makes me look too short, which is always an issue with wide leg, cropped trousers.

olive 1

olive 3

I’ve worn both pairs quite a lot since making, and I have to say just one thing.  As I don’t tuck my tops in, that cross-over detail in the front doesn’t get seen…  So if you tuck, you’ll be good!  One other thing – with the addition of the side seam pockets, I’ve removed the taughness/stability given to the cross-over pieces and they can get a bit wavey.  So maybe the answer is to just have back pockets, but not patch pockets.  A welt would work better, neater.

olive 4

Red Brick Linen

After a successful winter making terracotta/parika/rust coloured trousers to counter the denim, black and grey, it was time to do the same with the summer wardrobe – assuming summer is actually on the way (along with getting out of lockdown)!  I bought a little pile of fabrics from Rainbow Fabrics in the Autumn, one of which was a piece of viscose linen in what I thought was rust, but turns out to be more a red brick/terracotta colour.  No matter, I still like the colour, and it will still work with my summer wardrobe!

Burda trousers 102 July 2009

Having already decided on using a tried and tested pattern, Burda 102 from July ’09, I thought it would be a straightforward project.  But it seems I’ve done a lot of scribbling on the traced pattern in the past, jumped around with sizes and shortening locations, and generally just made a mess.  So I retraced the pattern, the 42 and 44 and toiled the 44, straight – no alterations.  I prefer to do that with a pattern I’m using for the first time, then I can see what I need to alter.  Given the different cuts and styles, you can’t really assume too much before-hand.  I knew I’d need to shorten the leg, guessing around 6 or so cm, and that there would need to be some sort of fiddling with the crotch depth/length.  And possibly some faffing with the waist….

In the end, I took a total of 5.5cm out of the leg length, 2.5 in the area between hip and knee and the remainder at the hem.  The waistband fitted just fine, but I felt the crotch depth was too short.  On measuring the crotch length, and comparing it to the length of the Teddy pants, which are really comfortable, I realised I needed to add 4cm to the overall length.  So I lengthened the crotch depth 1cm and added another centimetre to the depth of the waistband.  This made all the difference and the pants are now perfectly comfortable to wear!

Finding a suitably coloured zip was impossible, so a red one has sufficed.  I used some African waxed cotton for the inside waistband, which helps with stability (no stretching out of linen on my waistband!)  The insides are all overlocked to keep them neat and tidy, and found the right button in my stash. 

I love the richness of the colour and I just hope it doesn’t fade.  This is one problem I’ve been finding with the terracotta coloured fabric.  This particular piece is lovely, there’s something devine about a linen and viscose blend.  So much so, that when Rainbow Fabrics released new fabrics last month and I saw they had more – I bought more!!  This time the colour is more paprika/rust, and I have 3m…  I need to decide whether to make another Zadie Jumpsuit or the Wildwood Wrap Dress from Sew House Seven!  I bought the dress pattern when it came out – even though I’m not a dress person – because I just loved how it looked on everyone!  I have yet to trace and toile the pattern though!

 

Luxury Pyjamas

Better late than never with this post!!  I have a very quiet time on IG and here in the lead up to Christmas time because I was busy making presents!  Then we had the announcement that Chirstmas wasn’t happening the way we’d all planned and I had to post everything.  I waited for the mad rush to be over before I sent mine, I really didn’t want my handmade items getting lost or going missing in the huge pile the post office had to deal with all of a sudden.  Which all means getting photos of said items was heavily delayed.  But I have some now!

Grown up pyjamas

I’d decided to make luxurious pjs for the girls for Christmas – proper, grown-up pjs!  I looked at all sorts of fabrics;  double gauze, flowing viscose, tencel and cotton lawn.  I knew Daughter No1 would want hers in a plain fabric, and I tried very hard to find a terracotta or something that looks like it’s been dyed with avocado.  In the end I decided I really wanted tencel, it would give the luxurious feel I was after, would be lovely to sleep in, and not get hot!  But budget constraints hit hard, tencel is expensive!  In the end I found some tencel twill in suitable plain colours from The Fabric Room, minimum order was 3m per fabric, which is fine for a pair of pjs!

I ordered two samples and waited.  They were quick to come and I was perfectly happy with both.  The colour, handle and drape were perfect, so I jumped in and ordered 3m of each of two colours.  They were realtively quick to arrive, given the pressures the postal service was under at the end of November and  beginning of December.

The pattern for Daughter No 1 was going to be the Carolyn PJ pants.  I chose a couple of sizes bigger in the width, to give the baggy look she was after, and an oversized shirt pattern from Burda.  She wanted the “I’m wearing my bigger boyfriend’s shirt” look.  The pj trousers were to be simple, no piping.  I should have found a way to get her leg length correct though, I need to go back and shorten the trousers!  The tencel sewed so beautifully, creases steam out quickly and, when pressed, it stays in place.  I used French seams throughout  to give the pants a high quality, and double turned the trouser hem.  There are no raw edges here!

Shirt 120b Burda 10/2016

The top was chosen a, because it was nice and big but proportionally still worked for a small size, and b, because it was long enough to be able to be worn without pants if wanted.  It has a shirt hem that is longer in the back than the front.  The pattern is shirt 120B from Burda October 2016, link to the German site, as the other one is as useful as a chocolate teapot.  The shirt has a front button band, small collar and stand and a back yoke that comes forward to the front with angled seams.  The sleeve is nice and wide and inserted on the flat, pleated into a buttoned cuff.  I’ve liked this pattern for ages, so when Daughter No1 hinted that she wanted an oversized shirt for pjs, this was the first one I thought of!

Again, it’s French seamed throughout and has double turned hems, lightweight fusible interfacing on cuffs, buttonband and collar pieces.  The buttons are from my stash of mother-of-pearl buttons.  I only use these for special projects, and when that project has reached the end of its life, the expectation is that the buttons are returned to live again on another project!  I really love the sky-blue colour of this tencel twill, and the sandwashed effect it has. 

Pj top details

 

The pyjamas were met with delight, once they were posted!  We had hit a snag with the sudden announcement of level 4 restrictions in London before Christmas, and again when Christmas travel was severely restricted, so we were unable to deliver in person.  However, thank goodness for WhatsApp and video calling!  The pjs have gone down a treat and I know she’s happy with her proper, grown-up pjs!

The Great Module Sewalong Challenge

You’ve seen the three tops in the form of Tee-shirts that are required in the challenge, but I have another!  I wanted to make a top from the February Burda, top 119.  I bought a metre and a half of grey marl sweatshirting with French terry back from Fabworks and boy was it the right fabric!!  Lets just say that I’m wearing that top whenever it’s clean and dry.  I traced the 42 and didn’t do a FBA, which, in hindsight, I really should have done.  There’s definitely upward pulling going on which a FBA would have prevented.  Ah well, next time!  I lengthened the body by 5cm and am definitely happy with that decision!  It would have been way too short otherwise.

 

collage grey top
Burda top 119 February 2020

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The fabric is perfect for the style, it holds the shape really well.  The only thing I’d change for the next time would be to reduce the height of the collar.  I’m wearing it folded over all the time – for me it’s just too high, so could do with 2-3cm shaved off on each side.  But apart from that, this is a great top!  I love with my 3/4 sleeve Uvitas, I like the colour and pattern popping out of the sleeve and just below the hem.  Looks like I’m talking myself into making another…

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Now for the pants…  These are the one item I’m not that sold on, and might will have to find a replacement for.  The pattern I chose is 107 from August Burda 2019 – which states it’s designed for fabrics with and without stretch, and which, in the magazine, they’ve made in ponte.  So I bought 2m of viscose ponte in pistachio from Fabworks and set to work.  Making a fly front, hip yoke pair of trousers in ponte was an interesting project.  I like the colour, but I wonder if it shouldn’t have had a little more oompfh.  Nevermind, as it is, I don’t think this pattern wasn’t necessarily designed for ponte fabric.

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Burda pants 107 August 2019

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I cut the 40, as the previous pair I made in wool in the size 42 are too loose.  But still I needed to take these in an extra 2cm on each side seam and 4cm in the back.  The waistband was interfaced with stretch interfacing, and still halfway though the day I’m having to yank them back up into place.  If, and this is a big if, I make this pattern again, I’ll remove a centimetre or two from the crotch depth, and make a 38 in a knit, possibly the 38/40 in a woven.  I love the pleats at the hem, that detail is just fabulous, but the rest of the garment just isn’t working.  It’s such a shame!!  I think I’m going to have to open the waistband up and insert some elastic, or possibly even grossgrain ribbon.  It just needs to stay up!!

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Hem and button details

So, three successful tees done, one sweatshirt top and one pair of dodgy trousers.  I have toiled the “topper” part of the challenge and have identified at least another 3 pairs of trousers that would fit the bill for the bottoms.  They’re all Burda patterns and will need to be traced, but at least I’m finally finding something in the latest magazines that I want to make!

Sew Alongs and Sewing Challenges

Hellooo!  It’s been a little quiet on this front lately, but rest assured, the sewing has continued!  The cashmere coat is finished, I just need to get photos that do it justice!  Standing in my sewing room with my phone propped up on a pile of books just isn’t doing any good.  And, there’s another coat to show you now!  I’m making good progress on shrinking the coating pile – at last!  Again though, I need some nice sunny weather and a helper to get some decent photographs.

With the coat and jacket sewing, there’s good focus, but I need little, quick projects to break it up a bit.  That’s partly why I thought signing up to Stef’s #SewYourWardrobeBasics would be a good idea.  There’s no pressure, you participate in that month’s challenge theme if it suits you, and don’t if it doesn’t.  So far, so good.  This month is stripes, and if you’ve been following me for any length of time, you’ll know that that’s my favourite sort of pattern!

I decided to splurge on Tees for the challenge and bought some cotton lycra from a proper fabric shop to make a Basic Instinct Tee, and a couple of pieces online from Montreux Fabrics for a Stellan Tee and a Lark Tee.  This will top up my summer tee pile quite nicely, but I wanted to squeeze in other projects too.

107 08 2019
Trousers 107 Burda August 2019

There’s an interesting pair of trousers in this month’s Burda that I’m keen on and might make in a linen, I’ll have to check the stash to see if there’s anything suitable.  I also rather liked one of the tops in the magazine.  However, when Fabworks posted on Instagram that they had a pistachio viscose ponte as their fabric of the month this month, and that was just £3 a meter, I gave in.  I knew right away that I wanted some for another pair of the trousers I remade last year, 107 from August 2019.  I imagine they’d be perfect secret pjs!  And to go with them?  That top from this February’s issue!  Under it the stripe tees, and over the top, one of the coats still on the list!  Sounds like an outfit on the way to a mini wardrobe – yes?

This is when I decided I might sign up to a bigger challenge, The Great Module Sew Along.  The idea is to sew 2 bottoms, 3 tops and a covering/jacket.  So far I have plans for all of the garrments, and don’t see why I shouldn’t be able to make the deadline for the challenge.  And best of all, it gives me focus to make those quick projects in between the bigger coat and jacket projects.  Oh, and there’s also the sewalong challenge in the Facebook sewing group I’m part of.  This month is bottoms, so two pairs of trousers it will be!  🙂

 

 

Cold Day in the Sun

 

It’s been tricky to catch up on the projects made for the daughters lately, they’ve had stuff delivered, either in person or by the very helpful Royal Mail, and I never see it again!  I have asked for photos, but so far nothing has been forthcoming.  So  I managed to persuade Daughter No2 to come home to help with the putting up of the Christmas tree, and to bring at least one item she’s had recently so I can get photos!

leaf print 1
Skirt 117 from February Burda 2017

leaf print 5

She brought one of the skirts I made using skirt 117A from February 2017 Burda.  I’ve been using up various bits of leftover fabrics on this pattern, and this one uses some fabric I bought aaaaages ago in Derby.  I had planned to make a jacket with it, I liked the leaf print at the time, and the canvas has good weight.  But – I never used it, and when I dug it out of the stash earlier this year, I knew I wouldn’t use it for myself.  I offered it to Daughter No2, not expecting that she’d go for it, when she said yes please!  Another of “those skirts”!

leaf print 2

leaf print 3

I added the pockets, again, and tried a chunky, exposed zip in the back.  I left the flaps off this time – not exactly intentional!  I’d been putting the pockets togeter and admiring my handiwork, when I realised the flaps were still sitting on the cutting table!  Oh well it’s worked out ok without them!  She’s actually had this skirt a while, and it’s been worn in both the warmer weather with tees and trainers, and now with tights, boots and a jumper.  The neutral colours of the fabric means it goes well with pretty much most of her wardrobe, and I love it with the orange coat I made her two years ago!

leaf print 4

It’s been rather chilly these last few days, winter has properly arrived with cold frosty mornings and bright sunny days.  I have a little pile of wintery stuff to use for more of these skirts, one a nice bit of leftover wool plaid that I’d made a jacket for Daughter No1 when she was in Sixth Form.  That fabric has been hanging around for a while!  Time to be used, and removed from my stash!

 

Reclaimed

A year or two ago, I made a pair of Stride pants from the Merchant and Mills Workbook.  I’d made the largest size and shortened them a bit, but I cannot remember just how much right now.  The pattern was fine and instructions did the job, but I never liked the finished trousers.  I was really disappointed because I’d used a beautiful piece of black and blue plaid wool from Fabworks.  I was annoyed that such a lovely piece of fabric was now a very unliked pair of trousers.  I never even took photos of those pants!

So why didn’t I like them?  They were too wide, too floppy and the pleated front with waistband on the natural waist just didn’t suit me.  And I love wide, floppy trousers!!  So I wore them around the house for the first year, last winter I didn’t wear them at all, and this winter I decided I’d put them in the adjust or remake pile.  I had 6 pairs of wool trousers to make two sizes smaller before I got to these, and at that point I had no ideas of how to make these better.

Then, last weekend, when I was clearing the piles to make way for a visitor, I had a brainwave after dropping a piece of fabric.  It was the toile for Burda trousers 107 08/2019.  I’d traced the 44 – after making the 42 in the last pair of Burda trousers and finding them to be just a little on the small side!  But the toile for these was way too big!  So I needed to go down a size, definitely, and shorten the leg by 3-4cm to get the finished cuff to sit in the right place (to look the same as the model in the magazine).  The adjustments to the pattern were already made & I thought I had the right fabric to make a proper pair.

But – I was sort of reluctant to cut that fabric – see previous post!  The pattern can be made in fabrics with or without stretch, and the one in the magazine is made in ponte (that’s a good idea for next time!)  Back to that brainwave – could there be enough fabric in the Strides to be able to recut this pattern??  So I got cracking with the seam ripper, carefully unpicking all the seams, taking off the waistband and removing the zip.  After a good press to flatten the hems and seam allowances, I pinned the two fronts and two backs together, making sure the plaid was lining up too.  Then I took a deep breath and tried to get the new pattern pieces onto the existing trouser pieces.

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Burda trousers 107 08/2019

The back fitted perfectly, the front needed the grown-on zip facing to be removed, so I cut that as a seperate piece and attached it later.  Pockets and facings were going to be tricky, but, here’s the good part.  I had saved all the left-over bits of fabric from the original cutting out in the wool box!  Woohoo for scrap-stashing!  So, hip yoke pockets, waistbands, cuffs and the fly facing were cut from the left-overs, and a scrap of lining sorted the pocket bags.  I also managed to line up the plaid, high five!  I reused the zip and found a good button in the button box, I bought nothing to make these new trousers.

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Hip yoke pockets are lined with a scrap of lining fabric.

The making went well, instructions didn’t need much altering.  I usually insert the fly zip immediately after making the pockets up, it’s so much better to do without all the extra legs in the way.  The other thing I changed was to sew the pleats in the trouser cuffs first.  Darts and pleats first, whether at the waistline or at the hem!  I just knew that if I left it to the end when the instructions finally have you do them, I’d have lost more than half of the tailor’s tacks, and as both the leg seams are sewn up, you have more fabric hanging around than you’d really want.

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Centre back seam in the waistband to help with alterations (if required) later on

I rather like these!  I’m keen to make a pair in ponte now, I think they’d be so comfy.  They’re admittedly a little loose on the waist still, but I have a secret trick to fix that quickly.  I don’t cut back waistbands on the fold, I add a centre back seam.  Then, when sewing the crotch seam, I leave the last 15cm of the back open.  Then the waistbands are added, in halves (one front and one back).  Add the waistband facings, press, understitch, etc and then sew that back seam, all in one go!  This means that if you need to take in, or let out, the back seam, there’s very little to have to unpick, and it’s so, so easy to adjust!!  Men’s trousers are sewn this way, so why not ours??

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Anyway, I’m off to enjoy wearing this gorgeous fabric now, and I might have to find a good colour ponte for another pair, some secret tracksuit pants!

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Apologies for not noticing when taking the photos that the camera had decided that the teak chest of drawers was far more interesting to focus on than my trousers!!

Floaty

I’ve got a bit of a backlog of projects still to show you, most of them items I made for Daughter No 2.  And a couple of my own.  Today’s offering is a blouse that I’d been putting off making for a while (I’m not a glutton for punishment!), but eventually I had to give in and get it made.  Daughter No 2 had asked for this blouse to be made in a piece of burgundy wine coloured fabric we bought from the Fancy Silk Store a rather long time ago now.  It’s polyester (so doesn’t like the iron), is drapey, floaty and slippy.

 

floaty 1
Blouse 130 from Burda November 2013

The pattern is 130 from Burda November 2013.  (The link is to the German site, the usual one is still hinky, and I don’t think it will ever be as good a resource for archive patterns as it was.)  I traced the 36 and didn’t toile…  I figured it was a loose fit anyway, so will be ok.  I decided to French Seam everything on the inside to keep it all lovely and neat.  The front and back opening slits were both shortened, the front is now 15cm long, otherwise it would gape and show underwear, and that’s something Daughter No 2 did not want.  The back was also shortened, but not as much as the front.  Unfortunately, in the photos we took, none are of the back opening!

floaty 3

floaty 6

The neckline is bound with self bias, as are the openings.  All would have been fine, but I shouldn’t have followed the instructions in the pattern to cut the bias strips to just 2cm wide.  It’s not quite enough, I should have cut 2.5 as a minimum especially for the neckline and the cuffs.  So if you’re planning on makng this blouse, that’s my reccommendation, cut wider bias strips!  Because the fibre content is polyester, it really didn’t want to stay pressed, which was a bit of a pain.  I used a lot of pins!

floaty 2

Another thing to be wary of is the width of the sleeve band.  The sleeve edge is fully gathered into the bias band, and it does come up a tad narrow.  Thankfully Daughter No2 has narrow hands and skinny wrists, because we’d have come unstuck otherwise!  So check that measurement over your hands, because you might just get to that point and not be able to get the blouse on.

floaty 5

But, I’m really happy with how it turned out, and might be persuaded to make another, but in a natural fibre this time…  That sleeve really is the best part of the whole top!  It’s basically a deep pleat, and is only secured with a few small stitches.  I reinforced the area with a scrap of fine sheer polyester fusible interfacing before stitching the pleat in place.  I hope it will give the area enough stability.

floaty 4

In the mean time Daughter No 2 really loves this blouse and, funnily enough, has plans for me to make another…  But NOT in polyester!

Summer’s End

I have a little navy blue linen jacket that I wear in the summer, I made it somewhere in 2013 – I think.  I’ve tried looking for it on the blog, but I can’t find it, so I couldn’t have blogged it!  Anyway, it wasn’t the first time I’d used that particular pattern, and certainly wasn’t the last!  The pattern in question is 116/7 from April 2009!  (edit -*- I’ve found a picture of the blue jacket in this post, and an unlined version with Hong Kong seam finishes here!) I’d always loved the shape, the fit was good and three quarter sleeves for summer are perfect.  It’s a jacket that lives on the back of a chair in the dining room, in easy reach for dashing out if the weather is a bit inclement.  I really wanted a jacket that would do the same for the winter, but couldn’t choose a pattern.

116 april 2009
Jacket 116 Burdastyle April 2009

The problem with winter jackets is that they tend to either be smart blazer types, or loose, floppy, outdoor utility types.  I needed a casual jacket that I could wear with dresses, skirts, jeans and trousers.  Something in a colour that would fit seamlessly with my winter colours and not feel too smart.  And it needed to be warm – obviously!  While in Plymouth on the way to Cornwall in September I bought a piece of textured black cotton with the required weight and that became what I wanted to work around, but I still wasn’t having any luck with the style of jacket.

Two weeks ago, I was trying to work out what I could make with some small, left over pieces of various fabrics when I uncovered a piece of smoked paprika coloured corduroy.  This I’d bought last year at the sewing show at Ally Pally in October, and made a pair of Kana’s Standard trousers. (That link, apart from showing you the lovely colour of my trousers, also has a boiled wool version of the above jacket!) There was leftover because I’d bought 3m of that gorgeous colour.  I realised there was enough for a cropped jacket and offered it to the girls for a denim jacket style jacket.  They politely refused…. That’s when I had one of those lightbulb moments!  I would make my own cropped jacket!  But not too cropped – and with long sleeves.  And I knew exactly where to start.

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Burdastyle jacket 116 04/2009, lengthened!

I dug that jacket pattern out of the files and grabbed the pattern paper.  The jacket body was lengthened 5cm, I basically just traced the hem and curved front details and stuck the paper down 5cm from the original hemline.  I moved the patch pockets down by the same 5cm, it actually makes them much easier to access!  The sleeves have a “built-in” cuff, which I never really used, so I worked out that I needed 10cm more in the sleeve length and proceeded to lengthen by extending the seamlines on the sleeve patterns.  I checked the final width and was happy with where it came to, I want to be able to wear jumpers under this jacket, so I want room!  I didn’t toile but I did pin the paper together and do a quick paper fitting!  I have to add here that the pattern in the magazine is unlined, I made my own lining pieces, and so far have only made one version (out of 6) that isn’t lined!

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Scraffito lining

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With everything sorted I got cracking with cutting out, making the upper collar 3-4mm bigger on the outer edges, I’d already enlarged the front by the same amount.  This helps with “turn of cloth”, making sure the under collar stays under!  I also cut the under collar on the bias, with a centre back seam.  The jacket was definitely going to be lined, so I decided to interface properly with canvas chest pieces and a back stay.  I also interfaced the hems to get a nice sharp line and prevent “soft” hems.  I chose a black and white scraffito print viscose lining from the stash that I’d bought originally from Fabworks for the other half’s non-existent coat.  It’s non-existent because he still hasn’t chosen a lining.

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Topstitching and patch pockets with flaps helps to make the jacket feel more casual.

Anyway, the putting together went well, and I decided to add all the pockets and flaps this time, to emphasise the casualness of the jacket.  I put a few pictures on Instagram in my story highlights of the construction process, it’s by no means all of it, just a peek.  I had a headscratching moment for the buttons, trying to decide between vintage bronze dome buttons from the local antiques shop, or cool timber buttons a friend sent from a trip to Canada a few years back.  In the end I liked the change of size with the bronze buttons, and that they lend a sort of military look to the jacket.

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I really love this new jacket!  It has taken the place of the navy linen jacket for the cooler weather and has been worn on numerous occasions already!  The rich colour goes perfectly with my blues and greys and inevetable black for the winter with ease.  It’s going to be a top star in my winter wardrobe!

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