Work in Progress 1/2022

Woohoo, first Work in Progress of the year!  This time there’s no tutorial or how to, just me trying to hold myself accountable to the ongoing list in my head!  Sooo…  In progress are a couple of projects for the girls and some projects taking care of the growing mountain of scraps in the corner of the sewing room.

Starting with the girls’ projects.  Waistcoats – or vests for my American friends.  I have been informed that those delightful fashions of the 90s are back in vogue, and top on the list of those fashions are waistcoats.  Daughter No1 is particularly keen on a waistcoat as top, so I trawled through 5 years of Burda magazines from 1996 to 2000 and found two patterns she liked, also found a pattern envelope in the pattern drawers and another that was the same as one of the magazine ones, but available in more sizes.

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collage 2889

I’ve toiled Burda 2889 and New Look 6943, and I think she’s gong to prefer the fit of the Burda.  I need to post these now and I hope there won’t be too many fitting adjustments to be made.  She’s wanting one in black and another in white, so as soon as I know one of them is the winning pattern, I’ll get buying fabric!

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Waistcoat patterns

Daughter No 2 is also on a 90s vibe, and fancies some of the long, flowing viscose dresses we used to wear.  Again, the Burda magazines have come up trumps and I have a pattern to toile this week.  It’s number 129 from the April 1994 (South African edition) magazine.  We had a video call over two boxes of magazines and there are a few other things she’s after, but I won’t list them all now!  I’ll start with the dress and trace the others after it’s toiled.

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Dress 129 from the April 1994 Burda magazine – South African issue

However, I have made another toile for her, a pair of shorts from what I’m sure is a very late 80s pattern, although it might be early 90s.  New Look 6009 has three shorts offerings, we’ve gone with the longer length with turn-ups.  Again. toile is done, just need a fitting done.  Fingers crossed, because I really like this pattern!!

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New Look shorts 6009

So that’s what’s on my sewing table for the girls, looks like summer is on the way!!  Do you have summer sewing plans?  I can’t say I have a pressing desire to sew anything massively summery for myself just yet – I’m sitting here with thick socks and a chunky jumper on to keep warm!

Work in Progress Wednesday 5/21

I haven’t intended to have so few Work in Progress posts this year, it’s not as if I haven’t been sewing – just not thinking of taking photos while I work and getting round to posting anything!  Today I’ve made a start on a new jacket.  I’d realised that I had no black jacket for the winter – time to put that right.  As I said in a previous post, the Burda patterns haven’t exactly been inspiring lately, but there were two in the August magazine that caught my eye.  I’ve already made the trousers, this is the other pattern.

Jacket 111 Burda August 2021

Jacket 111 is slightly boxy, hip length, double breasted with collar and interesting sleeves.  It was the sleeves that made me stop and look again, they’re cut in three, with horizintal seams.  Volume has been added in each piece, creating a cocoon shape which is emphasised in the magazine’s version with piping.  Initially I wanted to use up the remains of the cotton jaquard from my Mother’s Day coat, and add plain navy.  But it wasn’t to be, there just wasn’t enough of the jaquard.  But I had something else…

I traced the 44 and toiled in some old curtain fabric, waiting to see what I’d need in the way of an FBA.  I didn’t need any width, there’s plenty of ease in this jacket!  But I needed the shoulders to be narrower, they hung over too far, even for a loose, casual fitting jacket.  I altered the line of the armhole to take into account 1cm of shorter shoulder seam, and it’s worked.  For the bust, I decided on moving the bust dart down 2cm and then adding depth in the front.  I added 2cm of depth, and took in the excess at the side seam in the dart.

A second toile of the front (I took the seam ripper to the first front pieces and took them off) revealed the adjustments worked.  I left the length of the jacket and sleeves alone, they’re all fine.  I had thought to make welt pockets in the front, instead of the inseam pockets the pattern has, but got lazy and just left the existing pockets!

Interfacing and support

I chose not to add all the structure I’d usually use to this jacket.  I have the standard interfacing, weft insertion fusible on the t-front, back yoke and supporting the underarms, sleeve head, collars and a lighter weight fusible on the facings.  I’ve also added 5cm deep bias cut interfacing to the hem area to support the fold.  I’ve also kept the cotton fusible tape along the front edge to stop it stretching out of shape and just make that area all nice and crisp.  What I’ve left out is the canvas chest piece that always goes into one of my jackets.  But I have decided shoulder pads are a must.  The pattern doesn’t call for shoulder pads, but it just didn’t look right like that, I much prefer it with the pads in.

Sleeve details, no piping this time, just topstiched seams

I thought I’d share my method of sewing inseam pockets in this post.  This method gives you a really nice neat finish, I never use the Burda method!  Well, not any more, anyway!  So here goes.  First thing  to do is to consider whether or not the fabrics you’re using need support.  If you’re like me, your pockets are going to be well used!  Another thing to look at is the weight of your fabric – mine is bulky so I’ve chosen to cut the pockets from the lining fabric but I don’t want to see lining fabric when I open the pocket.  So I’ve cut a 5cm wide pocket facing that will be attached to the back pocket piece.

pocket bag with facing

Start with placing the front pocket pieces right sides together with the front pieces and sew along the seam line between the markings.  Start and stop exactly on the markings.  Then snip, at a slight angle from the edge of the fabric to the markings/end of stitching.  Go slow here, you can always snip a little more, but once you’ve gone too far you’ll have to start again.  Then press the pocket bag seam with the seams under the pocket bag and understitch from mark to mark again.  Turn that under and press well.

Stitch pocket to front between markings
Snip to end of stitching
Understitch pocket bag
Press packet bag to the inside and topstitch if you want to

If you’re facing the pocket, sew it onto the pocket bag now.  Then place the pocket bag ontop of the front pocket bag and sew around the bag, neatening the edges afterwards.  I like to double stitch pockets in jackets, if I get a hole, I have another line of defense!  And overlocking, or zigzag stitching helps the edges not to fray while bouncing around between your jacket fabric and the lining.

I stitch a double row around the pocket bag and overlock the edges
Finished pocket, topstitched
And it’s big enough to stash all sorts of things in!
Jazzy lining and a complete pocket

This method of sewing your inseam pockets results in a nice neat finish, the Burda instructions will give you a pocket, but it won’t be as nice as these!

So, pockets, shoulder seams, collar, side seams, sleeves – shell done.  Tomorrow I’ll sew up the lining and attach it to the facings, turn up the hems and tidy the last tailor’s tacks.  But I need to decide on snaps, it’ll all depend on whether the local shop has black snaps in a suitable size.  If they only have silver ones, I’ll probably cover them with black lining fabric.  I don’t want shiny silver snaps!  Hopefully they have something I can use, otherwise I’ll have to order something online and the completion will be delayed.  Not that I don’t have anything else to be getting on with in the mean time!

I’m curious about your chosen inseam pocket method, do you have one method you always use?  Or do you follow the instructions that come with the particular pattern you’re using?

Diving into the Pattern Archives

It’s no secret that I have a large vintage pattern collection.  I’ve been trying for ages now to shrink it, largely unsuccessfully!  I had a good clearout last month and got ruthless – I’m only keeping the patterns I love (no matter what size they are) and those that will fit the girls.  Everything else must go!  In that clearout, I re-found a Burda pattern for wide legged pleated trousers.  They sit on the waist, have a decent sized box pleat in the front and a fly zip.  They look good!

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Burda 3057

I decided I’d have to make them and promptly bought 2m of birds-eye navy wool flannel from Fabworks for the job.  I toiled the 44 and made some adjustments to the pattern.  The legs were very wide!  So I graded down to the 40, from the 44 at the hip down.  As they were to sit on my non-existant waist, I had to grade up to the 46 for the waistband, plus a little bit.  They also needed to be shortened.  A lot!!  But the rest was great, the crotch depth and curve worked with the style of the pants, and I love the way the pleat covers the top part of the pocket.

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Burda trousers, pattern number 3075 from the 1990s

And while we’re talking pockets – these babies are huge!!!  I can fit my entire handbag of stuff in there!  When did pockets become so unuseable, if they could make them so usefully sized back in the 90s?  I decided that as I was using such a lovely wool that I’l line the trousers – fully!  Fabworks were offering 3m of matching lining free when you bought a certain amount of wool from them at the time of shopping, so I used what they sent.  It’s a really good quality viscose twill, in lucious navy blue.

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Big pockets and a nifty pleat detail

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I cut the lining by pinning the hip yoke pocket piece to the trouser front and treating them as one piece.  The lining was made up the same as the trouser, and attached to the waistband at the top.  I handstitched it to the fly area.  The lining hangs free down to the hem, I like to have it free for ironing after washing, makes it easier.

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I bloody love these pants!!!  Wool flannel is just so fabulous to wear, it’s warm and cosy and has such a wonderful drape!  Wearing these pants feels like swooshing around in a long skirt, but much more practical.  I was initially worried that lining the wool would make the trouser legs feel wider, because of the extra layer of fabric.  But I don’t feel funny in these at all.  I’ve bought another length of wool flannel, this time from Rosenberg & Son when they came to Knowle at the beginning of October – there might be another pair of these in the wardrobe soon, in grey herringbone!  Or I might try another vintage pattern, so many to choose from!

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ps, If you’re after anything (vintage pattern-wise), drop me an email and I’ll see if I have something suitable.  At the moment I’m updating my Etsy shop, it will be open again on the 1st November!

Scrapbusting Trousers

After cutting that Grace Coat from my 3m of navy twill, I had a decent sized, if not a little awkwardly shaped, piece of fabric left over.  Early in October I decided, on a whim, to use it up and make a quick pair of trousers using a Burda pattern I used two years ago now.  It’s 117 from November 2018.  The original pair are too big now, so I traced the 42, but kept the shorter length adjustment I’d made back then.

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Burda trousers being shown off in London

The waistband of the pattern has a piping band through the centre, but I didn’t have enough fabric to cut 4 waistband pieces, so I had to give that a miss this time, not that you get to see it anyway!!  I cut the waistband facing and the pocket bags from left over shweshwe from my last Zadie Jumpsuit which also helped with bulk reduction.  A bit of pattern tetris was required to get the must-have pieces onto the fabric, including taking 1cm off the hem depth to get the length in!

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Making up is quick, I made the same adjustment to the back welt as last time, actually inserting a welt pocket instead of just pretending.  I use that pocket for my phone all the time, especially as the hip yoke pockets on these trousers really aren’t suitable for holding a phone.  The insides are all overlocked to prevent fraying.  I made a few small adjustments to the crotch curve and inside leg seams, changing the angle of the front line, the front curve and dipping a little at the back too.  I ended up taking in an extra cm on the front and back inseams from the crotch curve down about 15-20cm.  Somehow I aways end up with too much fabric here.

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scrap 3

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Whilst I will still be looking at some drag lines, one must be realistic about trousers, you have to move in them!  And sit in them.  These will do just fine, and I’m glad I’ve used up the remains of the fabric, with the scrappiest of scraps relegated to the scrapbusting pouf.  I wanted another pair of casual trousers in my wardrobe, I always end up with too many smart wool pairs in the winter!

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It’s so hard to photograph dark trousers!  We had a great day in London, and I’m glad I got the chance to get photos, because at  home these dark  pants would have been impossible to photograph!!

Undercover Super Hero Cape

Everyone should have one, their own super hero cape.  When I was a kid it was my swimming towel, corners wraped around the straps of my swimming costume.  This long cardi is 126 from January 2011 issue of Burdastyle.  Daughter No2 had picked it out earlier this year, and I dutifully purchased 3m of black ponte from Fabworks to make it.

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Then I sat on it, prettier and more interesting patterns constantly jumped ahead of it.  Then finally in August, I put it on “the list”.  Now I had to get on with it!  Only 3 pieces, it was so quick and easy to make, I don’t know why I’d put it off for so long!  The overlocker was put to good use, and the sewing machine was drafted in for the twin needle stitching of the hems and front edge.

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The magazine has two versions of this cardi, one called a coat (126A) made with boiled wool and with a belt, and this one in jersey, as part of their loungewear collection.

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It’s a great pattern and I really want to make another, or two, one for me and another for daughter no 1 – at least.   I rather fancy one in a nice russet coloured boiled wool.  Just to find the right colour somewhere!  So, made back in August, this cardi was made about a month ago, and one of my entries for that month’s BurdaStyle Challenge.  Given that it’s already nearly the end of September, I wonder when I’ll blog those things I’ve made this month…

 

 

Work in Progress Wednesday

I realise that all of the posts in the last few years have been completed projects. I used to photograph as I sewed, I even posted as I worked, with the finished project at the end, nicely modelled on the daughter for whom it was made. So I thought, I might start that again! I’ve been working on a jacket for daughter no 1 using a 1m length of Linton Tweed. I like mixing things up a little, so I suggested we make a biker style jacket with the fabric, rather than something more predictable. That got the thumbs up!

I’m using the same Burda pattern as I did last year when I worked on the Refashioners project. This time, however, I’m not changing the pattern, because I don’t have to! 😀 So how far have I got? Well, I’m almost done… I cut and interfaced yesterday, block fusing so if there was any shrinkage it wouldn’t affect the pieces too much.

Pockets!

Today I did most of the construction, I thought I wouldn’t get as far as I did because I had ordered the zips online from Jaycotts and wasn’t sure when they’d arrive. Luckily, they came today! I used a black piece of wool for contrast and bulk reduction in certain areas, the welt for the pocket, facings, inner cuffs, waistband pieces & inner collar.

Setting the sleeve

I think it’s worked rather well! I needed the bulk reduction, this tweed is chunky! I’m actually using the wrong side here, we decided it was less busy, and more likely to be worn this way around.

This is what it looks like tonight, with just the lining, waistband, cuffs & snaps to go. Now my eyes are tired and it’s time for bed!

Mini James Dean

I’ve got a large plastic tub full of pieces of fabric left over from all sorts of projects, all big enough for something, but not something for me.  I’m always loathe to throw these bits out, or even to give them to the local school for the kids, because I know I can do something useful with them – eventually…

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So this project is me using up one piece of that stored fabric.  You’ll remember the Morgan Jeans I made last year, with a yummy, dark denim from Croft Mill Fabrics.  There was a piece left over that wasn’t much good for anything except maybe a tote bag, and that’s what I had in mind for it for ages.  But, going through the April issues of Burda looking for projects to make this month, I came across a cute kid’s denim jacket #134 04/2010.  A friend of mine has a little boy who’s 5 this year – it would be perfect for him! (and I thought it could be kept for his little sister to wear when she’s big enough)

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Kid’s Denim Jacket, Burda 134 April 2010

So I traced out the 6 year old size (110), and the pieces fit perfectly on what was left of my denim.  Go! Go! GO!  It was tricky to get the pins in, I’d forgotten that, and stiff to cut – oh dear, but I ignored the warning bells…

collage denim jacket
Lots of topstitching – I didn’t even try topstitch thread!

All in all, it’s a simple pattern to assemble, the instructions, while basic, are clear.  The only problem I had with the whole thing is the size of those little pattern pieces and the stiffness of the fabric!  I don’t mind admitting I swore a fair bit.  And I have made a vow, never make a tiny denim jacket with fabric that stiff ever, ever again!!!  It was really fiddly to turn the cuffs, the collar nearly killed my fingers (they got in the way of my pounding).  The only good thing was that my old Bernina sailed through all those layers of thick denim with consumate ease.

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Boy am I glad I’m only making one for two kids!  I think it would be lovely in a softer twill too, even a nice linen/cotton blend.  In order to reduce bulk around the welt pocket area, and to make it easier for my machine to get through layers, I cut the pocket pieces from another bit of left over fabric, black and white large check gingham cotton.  I deliberately did not choose something “boy-like” so that it could be handed down and worn again.  I like the idea of unizex clothing when it comes to items like jackets and coats.  Makes sense, money wise.  I remember as a kid, my mum bought me boys jeans that my brother got when I outgrew them, and my sister got them after that!  If there weren’t holes in them, that is.

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Gingham check cotton for the pocket bags

I didn’t want traditional jeans buttons, they can sometimes be stiff to use, and with this fabric it needed to be easier for little fingers, so I raided my vintage button box and dug out some military uniform buttons I’d got from the charity shop a year or so ago.  The small ones were perfect!  I’m really happy with how they look on the front of this jacket.

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My long-list for April’s Burda Challenge sewing was fairly long, and I decided against just chopping it down randomly, rather by seeing what fabric I had and going that way.  On that list were frequent referrences to “kid’s clothes” because the size range is right for my friend’s kids.  This is the first of those projects to be made and there’ll be more!  I need to get that fabric box emptied, and it’s nice to make clothes for kids, they’re usually much quicker and simpler than adult’s clothing.

Now I’m off to continue tracing the long list of patterns daughter no 2 would like made up for the summer – this summer! By the way, if you’d like to see her wishlist…

Follow the link to see the whole post, this just shows a part of it!  🙂

 

 

Smoke and Shadows

My first little foray into making clothes with a Japanese inspiration went well, I’ve worn the gingham linen top a lot in the past few weeks and I really love it as much as the first one I made in January.  I now have all three of the Japanese books I ordered, Clean and Natural and Kana’s Standard I & II.  My first project is inspired by the Flared Top in the Clean & Natural book, and is based on a Burdastyle pattern I made 3 versions of last year.

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Modified Burda top 124 5/15

Why use a Burda pattern instead of the pattern in the book?  Because the book has patterns for Japanese sized and shaped ladies, which is not me.  So I was always going to have to draft or alter something to make it work.  You can put large, baggy clothing on slim people and they still look great, but those same proportions on someone a “little” larger don’t work.  I certainly feel like I’m wearing a tent, which is precisely why I don’t use the plus sizes in the Burda patterns!!  Too long and too wide!

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So, here’s what I did to get my own version of the Flared Top.  The original pattern has a yoke front and back that starts under the arm and scoops up and over the bustline, the sleeves are grown-on.  The length of the top is 55cm, which is not too long.  The flare though, is substantial.  Lovely on a “skinny minny”.  That yoke line and flare over the bust is not flatterning on someone with a larger bust.  The yoke would have to sit much lower.  I decided on using #124 05/2015 because (a) I’ve made three others, so it’ll be quick, (b) the fit was already good, (c) it had a yoke in a good position, and (d) I’d be able to add flare to just the lower front and back pieces quickly and easily, after straightening out the curved hem.

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I added 2cm of flare to the hem on the front and back side seams of the lower pieces and divided the front and back into thirds.  The first third from the centres became the line where more flare was added.  I slashed and spread, adding 5cm at the hemline.  This meant the front and back pieces were 12 cm wider than the original pieces.  I figured this would be enough flare for me.

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I did not toile….  I went straight in with the fabric, I had some lovely misty grey viscose in the stash, bought last year or the year before from Clothspot.  It has that lovely drape and sheen that I love in a viscose.  I used French seams throughout and double turned the hems.  I omitted the keyhole opening of the original pattern and used bias for the neckline.

So, how did it work out?  Pretty well, I think.  I’m not putting this top into full rotation in the wardrobe until it warms up considerably!  I think it’ll be lovely in the summer, the flare will help air to circulate!  The colour is great and I think there’s just enough flare to give a nod to the Japanese pattern, with me still feeling comfortable in it.  I will be making it a little shorter though, I recon 5cm should do it.

flared top 1

If you’re the right size and shape to make a version straight from the book, the diagrams are simple to follow and you don’t need to know Japanese to make anything.  There is a great blog post here to help you understanding some of the terms you’d come across in these books.   For another version of the top, from the original pattern, here’s Sew Busy Lizzy’s beautiful top.

I’m already planning my next projects from these books, and have tweaked my easy fitting bodice block and drafted a Kimono block to help to get me started.  There are many patterns I want to try, I hope they all turn out as fabulous as they look in my head! 🙂  In the mean time, there’s still the Burda Challenge 2018 to get on with, and April is looking like it’s going to be full of sewing, although not that many patterns from this year’s issue have got me excited.  There seem to be more in previous years, but we’ll get to that in another post, shall we?

Short trousers means cold ankles

So here I am in the coldest March in the UK in a very long time, making cropped tousers again!  Instalment number two for the Burda Challenge is the cropped trousers from this year’s March issue of the magazine, number 111.  I’d dug out a piece of caramel stretch twill from the stash, probably bought from Croft Mill Fabrics, but it could have come from Clothspot.  I think I’ve had it around 2 years, so it’s nice to get it used up!

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Trousers 111 March 2018

I’d decided early on not to have all the extra zips on the front.  There is a very useable side zip for access, and these others are just for decoration, so I wasn’t about to waste time faffing putting in exposed zips I’d never use.  I might put some pretty buttons on the tabs eventually, but as for the most part, they will not be seen, I’m really not fussed.

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pocket details – and no zips in the pointy bits!

I removed 5cm from the length of the trouser between the crotch line and the knee line to get the correct length at the ankle.  I also changed the crotch curved in the back, dipping it by max 5mm in certain spots.  This made the usual creases under my butt magically decrease!  The facings were cut from left over bits of the gingham linen used for the Japanese inspired top, and I used that fabric for the pocket bag too.

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If there’s one negative about this pattern, it’s that there aren’t enough pockets.  So if I made the pattern again, I’d want to add pockets in the front somewhere, possibly using that pointy insert as a “welt” hiding the acces to the pockets there.  We’ll see.  But the pocket in the back went very easily.  The instructions in the magazine are the illustrated, elaborated kind, as opposed the the usual brief bullet points.  So if you’re afraid of welts, these instructions will see you right.  I love the shape, and it’s really not hard to have those points instead of the normal square edges.

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I like these pants, I wore them to the sewing show at the NEC all day and the stretch fabric behaved fairly well, not going baggy with all the sitting while driving, which was good.  They’ll be a great addition the the spring and early summer wardrobe (when it atually arrives), and I might be on the look out for a stretch poplin or cotton to make another pair, because this twill is too thick for wearing in the middle of summer.

collage caramel 2

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So thumbs up for this one!  I’ve got another Japanese inspired top for your inspection soon, and I’ll go through some of the books I’ve been buying to give you an idea of  the goodness inside!  But that’s me for March BurdaChallenge 2018, I thought I might make another pair of trousers, and perhaps a couple of tops, but it was not to be.  Just two pairs of cropped pants will do the job!

 

 

Coats for Christmas

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Longline jacket Burdastyle 101 May 2017

Sometimes you have to have early Christmas presents.  Those are the sort whose usefulness will be reduced if you have to wait for Christmas Day to receive them.  Definitely the case with coats!

Daughter No 1 spotted the long line blazer in the May 2017 issue of Burdastyle and immediately put it on her list of things for me to sew.  We just needed the right fabric – same old story.  So the project languished with all the others I desperately want to get on with, but am held back on.  The arrival of Autumn heralded a change round of fabric boxes, summer stuff into the back reaches of the cupboard, winter weights rediscovered.  And in that box was a 2.5m length of grey wool with a darker windowpane woven through it.  I’d bought it from Croft Mill Fabrics 2-3 years ago and never got round to turning it into the “perfect jacket”.

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But it could be the “perfect coat”.  The blazer in the May Burda was made with crepe, soft and draping.  But this was no heavyweight coating fabric – I thought we could gamble.  As luck would have it, Daughter No 1 rather likes grey and gave her seal of approval to it’s use for her coat immediately.  I also had a lovely dark blue satin lining in the stash (bought for the grey wool) that proved enough for the coat.

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A few adjustments were necessary, she didn’t like the slits in the side seams of the original coat pattern, so these were omitted, and she wanted less volume in the back.  I took the centre back seam in a total of 3cm at the waist, and 1cm on each side of the back panel where it joined the side panel.  This gives more shape to the coat, and eliminates the need for a belt, or half-belt as in the original design. I made small adjustments to the seams where the inseam pockets were to be inserted to that they’d be more invisible and have less bulk at the seam.

Collage tay coat

I pinned the checks of the windowpane together in a 20cm grid to ensure nothing moved around and to make sure the pattern would be easier to line up afterwards.  I drew lines on the pattern pieces to make sure I was laying everything out exactly and that the patterns would match.  It took some time, but was definitely worth it in the end.  I chose the speed tailoring route rather than traditional, time was of the essense here, and while I know you get a fabulous look with traditional tailoring,  I think you can get just as good a finish if you use speed tailoring correctly.

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All in all, it took 5 days from starting to cut until the coat was finshed.  I took my time, no rushing, and I’m dead chuffed with the result.  My second coat was to be a very different one, but there was a little change of plan after the first one was seen…

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Originally Daughter No 2 was looking at a more slouchy fit coat, dropped shoulders, slight cocoon shape.  I’d already got the wool, 3m of the most beautifuly soft lambswool from Fabworks Online. And the colour?  Most appropriately named “Autumn Maple”.  It’s gorgeous!!  On a flying visit home from Uni, she spotted the grey coat hanging in a wardrobe, tried it on and fell in love.  Thank heavens it didn’t quite fit her properly or I’d have been looking to make another for Daughter No1!!

Collage am coat

So I needed to trace the bigger size of the first coat, lengthen the sleeve by 4cm and make the same alterations in the back, and to the pockets, as I’d made first time around.  This fabric is a coating fabric, so I made the upper collar a little bigger that the first one to accommodate the turn of cloth, as well as the revers and remaining centre front.  (Tip, when making coats and jackets, always make the upper pieces bigger, never trim the under pieces smaller).

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Again, taking 5 days and working carefully with my interfacings, organza cloth and clapper, I think I managed to turn out a lovely looking coat!  I love the lining fabric which she chose from Fancy Silk Store.  The gold spots pick up on the orange of the coat and just shine.  I chose a dark bronze snap for the closure and attached it with nice neat buttonhole stitch.  I was tempted to use a brown or dark thread for this, but the orange makes it look like a star, and that I like.

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I love a good hidden in-seam pocket. #burdastyle #coat #inseampocket

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Both girls love their new coats, and the different fabrics and colours are enough that they don’t look like they’re wearing the same thing when they’re together.  At least, I hope not!!  They look amazing, and warm and cosy, which is the most important job of a coat.

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Now there’s still the matter of a certain coat for Mr W…  It might have to wait for next year.  There are plans afoot for trousers, more sweaters and some self drafted goodies for Daughter No1’s boyfriend.  If they get going before I have a “suitable” lining for the famous coat, they will be done first! 🙂

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